Wells Fargo Software Development Engineer Reviews | Glassdoor

Wells Fargo Software Development Engineer Reviews

Updated June 7, 2018
1 review

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Software Development Engineer

3.0
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Wells Fargo CEO Timothy J. Sloan
Timothy J. Sloan
1 Rating

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Pros
Cons
  • "Work life balance was a poor aspect of the job" (in 369 reviews)

  • "Can be hard to reach sales goals" (in 1270 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (2)

    "Lots of Work to Be Done But No Interest in Keeping Talent Around"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Software Development Engineer in San Francisco, CA
    Former Contractor - Software Development Engineer in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Wells Fargo as a contractor (More than a year)

    Pros

    - much to do, won't be bored
    - friendly team and management
    - many group huddles so everyone is on the same page
    - lots of DIY resources on the intranet to enhance tech skills

    Cons

    - very large corporation and entry level or associate level corporate workers are barely recognized beyond their name for the first year
    - severely lacking transparency from management about company decisions
    - no heads up where managers should probably share need to know items with their staff
    - no place for advancement unless you have put in 5 years
    - ambition to learn is not appreciated
    - also, there is a pending class action lawsuit for unethical business practices that is just brushed under the rug. ya...great morals there.

    Advice to Management

    - stop making the corporate feel worse than it already is with your cheap bureaucratic dialog; it gives folks false hope and makes them trust you when you don't deserve it in the slightest.
    - this isn't a car dealership; quit using sales tactics on your employees to steal their ideas and turn around and axe them when you're done with them