Werner Enterprises Reviews | Glassdoor

Werner Enterprises Reviews

Updated November 21, 2017
91 reviews

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C.L. Werner
23 Ratings

91 Employee Reviews

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  1. "Review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time

    Pros

    Alot of miles driving road

    Cons

    Treat people like cattle


  2. "Drivers are treated like peasants"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Trucker in Omaha, NE
    Current Employee - Trucker in Omaha, NE
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Werner Enterprises full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    There is none besides quiting and saving yourself from the headache and migraines this company gives drivers

    Cons

    They don’t care about when you need to get home. The night crew is rude and is no help I don’t even know why they are on payroll???? The Lakeland, FL terminal is like a dog park (get where I’m going with this) ANYWAYS....it’s no pay raise the miles are lies they tell you’ll average 2500 miles lets just say you’ll average around 1100 miles and they cap you. you will NEVER see 4 straight checks over $800 you only get 1 or maybe 2 $800 checks for the month I swear I can’t make this up I’ve been working here for 1 year so I KNOW!!! DONT WASTE YOUR TIME HERE HONESTLY GO TO ANOTHER COMPANY LIKE SCHNIEDER, MILTON, OR EVEN LOCAL!!! I promise you, you’ll make more money driving class b straight trucks then workin for Werner this company lost more drivers then a kid losing his socks after school. I PRE-WARNED YOU!!!!!!!! And trucks are really slow they go 65mph only so imagine being in the Tennessee mountains :)

    Advice to Management

    Shut the company down and go play in some rocks. This company SUCKS!! the pay sucks management sucks the trucks sucks.

  3. "Poor Management"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Omaha, NE
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Omaha, NE
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Many positions available to move to

    Cons

    No pay raises, poor management, no direction from HR, no employee reviews done, did I say really poor management.

    Advice to Management

    Time to look outside of the company but make sure the candidate actually knows the business. Perform quality reviews and give the employees some say in what direction the business can go.


  4. Helpful (1)

    "High quantity, poor quality training = bad for new or experienced truckers"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Culture & Values
    Former Employee - Class A Truck Driver
    Former Employee - Class A Truck Driver
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    If you are an experienced trucker, think hours of service laws are for wussies and want an easy way around HOS limitations on elogs, Werner's system makes it easy to cheat elogs

    Cons

    Company compels ALL their drivers to become trainers, when being a trainer requires certain characteristics not all good truck drivers have. Good trainers help you identify and coach you to avoid mistakes; bad trainers (which you get when a company shoehorns those not particularly cut out to be trainers to become trainers anyway) merely yell at you for rookie mistakes without actually constructively helping you avoid them
    If you're an experienced trucker, you will get shoehorned into training; if you decline, several experienced Werner drivers confirm your dispatcher will reduce your loads and miles
    Trucks are brand new and delicate; stall once due to skipping a gear = engine light = has to get serviced. Inconceivable a trucking company taking on rookie drivers straight out of CDL school would have such delicate trucks that must be taken to a shop after a single missed-gear stall.
    Trainers get good CPM while trainees get a weekly salary that, depending on where your home is may be challenging just to pay your rent + bills if you happen to live somewhere that has a high cost of living (San Francisco, Seattle, New York City, etc.).
    Combining the forced-into-becoming-a-trainer with small salary for trainee with higher CPM for trainer makes it suspiciously easy for a dazed-and-just-figuring-things-out rookie to overlook and not think too hard on their trainer bypassing elog hours-of-service limitations by having the trainer drive on the trainee's credentials, effectively giving them unlimited hours to drive, the trainer gets the CPM pay regardless of whose credentials the truck is moving under, while the trainee only gets a small weekly salary and the trainer doesn't have to spend too much time actually training the trainee. This is what my "trainer" did, and while that's a teeny sampling, I realized in hindsight Werner's culture of forcing experienced truckers to become trainers, and paying Werner's trainers more for all miles driven even if they are on the trainee's credentials makes it easy and profitable to cheat on e-logs.

    Advice to Management

    Recognize quality training is more important than high-quantity training, stop shoehorning your experienced drivers into becoming trainers. If you believe being great at driving a truck automatically makes a trucker great at training a fresh-out-of-CDL-school rookie, that causes unnecessary harm to safety and quality of service, and wastes human resources -- new truckers -- which, according to many reports, are in short supply and that shortage is worsening.

    Assuming the incentivization of elog cheating is not intentional, get rid of the elog cheat incentivization by not paying trainers for miles driven on trainee's elog credentials.

    Consider getting rid of and replacing your new driver training program that emphasizes only having trainers whom are particularly good at training, have those trainers as dedicated trainers first and foremost and not hauling "hot" freight loads which preclude time margins to dedicate to skill and confidence building/strengthening for new drivers. Trainers should be given "easy" loads that are not time-critical and allow time on the road to train basic skills like shifting and backing, and particularly extra skills not covered by CDL schools like installing and uninstalling tire chains, practical in-the-field understanding of the various paperwork (manifests, bills of lading, etc.), how to prepare for customer security checkpoints, etc. Trainer pay, bonuses and/or incentives should be focused on rewarding high graduation-from-training rates from training more than normal non-trainer truck driving pay/bonuses. "Washing out" trainees should be viewed as toxic and undesirable; while you may have a steady supply of fresh CDL school graduates, it should be recognized that washing out recruits -- in addition to wasting your own resources -- is a negative externality contributing to the numerous social ills of American society. Washing out of something like trucking that requires a significant personal commitment of time, money and mental health (it is a hard and stressful hill to climb). That many make it through should not diminish respect and concern for the huge effort it takes, and a wannabe trucker whom washes out because you assigned them a trainer lacking the rare-but-necessary-trait-for-trainers traits of coolness-under-fire (I know when I skip a gear and this leads to stalling a truck while on the highway, its as terrifying for my trainer as it is myself), patience (yes, to master something you haven't mastered means having to do it again and again and again and again, and a trainer needs the patience to do this over and over and over and over again and again for each student), dynamic (every student's personality, strengths and weaknesses will differ, so a training regimen that works well for one trainee won't necessarily work well for all trainees), perceptive (able to pick up on what a trainee is shakey on, even if it doesn't result in a sudden explosive failure like stalling a truck -- and preferably be able to detect that weakness /before/ it results in such a failure). The trainer fell fall short on all of this; he gave me a lot more yelling for my flubs than calm instruction on how to not make them. I did not need his help to recognize that stalling the truck while on the highway was a serious failure; I already had myself in a panic before he yelled -- and getting yelled at, of course, only exascerbated my panic. I wound up having chest pains and tightness after just a couple weeks of this that, fortunately, after getting sent home, getting on expanded medicaid and having checked out with a dedicated cardiologist, turned out was not due to anything going on with my heart and, by default, means it was just a panic attack.

    Whatever features you look for in your truck purchases for normal freight, you should really consider different characteristics for training trucks -- namely, they should not be too delicate in the face of the common mistakes every rookie trucker will make and need time to learn to avoid, such as skipping gears leading to stall-outs. Its infeasible to the point of impossibly ridiculous to expect a greenhorn trucker to not make these mistakes; most CDL trucking schools scrape by using older trucks that were a lot more mechanical. Even if a rookie trucker came from the best CDL school and they had mastered the trucks they practiced on at their CDL school and passed their state CDL exam in, those trucks are often older and more mechanical; there is definitely an adjustment to newer trucks. Specific to my transition, the Werner truck I was training in was TOO smooth and quiet. I learned to shift based on vibration and sound that were completely absent in the new, highly electronic Werner truck. I almost washed out entirely after getting sent home on paranoia my trainer had over my skin exema (he freaked out believing I had a contagious flesh-eating disorder, which exema is not, but Werner management acceded to his paranoia; additionally my trainer's habit of yelling at me when I made mistakes and not having constructive preventive instructions on how to prevent the mistake I had created what turned out to be panic attacks) ... I've wound up finding more of a home in tiny trucking companies with older equipment similar to the older trucks my CDL school had. It would be nice to learn how to drive the newer trucks, but I cannot see that happening with a company with the poor quantity-over-quality training culture Werner seems to have.

    You may not be legally liable for what becomes of someone weaknesses in your training program, trainer qualifications and intentional-or-not turnover-magnifying have washed out of working for your company, and in many cases for brand new truckers, trucking in general, but it still costs you by worsening the shortage of truckers as well as increasing the number of people in our society with mental health difficulties (if it hasn't occurred to you that stressing someone out leads to actual mental health problems, ask any mental health professional -- don't have to go far, that's the academic field human resource professionals come from), drug abuse and crime (when you break someone, logically they would be more prone to make these destructive life turns). No, you wouldn't see an instant, easy-to-show rise in profitability by curtailing unintentionally bad practices that make your turnover rate for new recruits worse than it otherwise would -- but being able to retain more of the recruits you invest resources into would provide a glimpse at a fraction of the benefits provided by adjusting your training program, trainer selection criteria and trainer pay basis using carefully considered wisdom.


  5. Helpful (2)

    "For someone with 1 to 2 months exp, desperate ppl"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Class A Truck Driver in Allentown, PA
    Current Employee - Class A Truck Driver in Allentown, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Werner Enterprises full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    See Werner trucks everywhere build lasting friendships with drivers

    Cons

    Low miles, low pay, lots of sitting, no detention (sitting) pay.

    I have 2 yrs experience and I quickly saw how they would take advantage of their truck drivers!

    Constantly watch your paycheck, loads, and miles, you will be jipped!

    They do not pay a set detention, drop and hook or layover pay! Unless you complain, then they'll throw you a couple bucks.

    They care more about the people in the office than the drivers who actually keep the company going.

    Try to avoid these big companies and make it your goal to fix your credit because working at these companies you'll never be able to save much. With good credit and /or money buy your own truck DO NOT LEASE and be your own boss! That is the only way you'll succeed in the trucking industry. Werner, Swift, etc...they're out to hurt your pockets and waste your time!

    Advice to Management

    Drivers talk! Soon youll be doing a complete overhaul like JB Hunt!


  6. Helpful (1)

    "They do not care about their drivers"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Over the Road Driver in Atlanta, GA
    Former Employee - Over the Road Driver in Atlanta, GA

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time

    Pros

    They will hire you back

    Cons

    If you get hurt on the job do not count on work comp for help. They will pay off every lawyer you hire to turn on you and work for them.Most of them in Ne already work for them. Stay safe and stay healthy. .

    Advice to Management

    Treat people like humans and not like dogs


  7. Helpful (1)

    "ZERO INTEGRITY"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time

    Pros

    The only problem is that I have a clear conscience now.

    Cons

    Upper management from Omaha safety department allowed a new manager to lag along, get away with forgery of official DOT documents, and having no clue of interpersonal skills.

    Advice to Management

    OPEN YOUR EYES!

  8. Helpful (2)

    "DRIVER OR OTHERWISE, STEER-CLEAR OF WERNER!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Transportation Manager in Omaha, NE
    Former Employee - Transportation Manager in Omaha, NE
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    They will take just about anyone with a pulse and a fairly clean CDL. Decent training in the beginning.

    Cons

    Werner is for a select individual. If you like a 'gentlemen's club' culture and getting yelled at on a regular basis by your direct manager, then this is the place for you!

    Advice to Management

    TRY to care about your employees more than how stuffed your pockets are. That includes drivers as well.


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Worst of the worst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Class A CDL Delivery Driver in Windsor, CT
    Current Employee - Class A CDL Delivery Driver in Windsor, CT
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Werner Enterprises full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    None that i can think of

    Cons

    Im not some salty guy when i tell you you have to fight to get paid properly

    Advice to Management

    If they put in as much effort helping people as they did screwing with folks they would keep a lot more folks


  10. Helpful (1)

    "Be careful"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Dedicated Driver
    Former Employee - Dedicated Driver
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Werner Enterprises full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    A good starting company, if your a new driver. You get a pay check

    Cons

    Bad management, lack of support, favoritism, little to no communication between dispatch and drivers, they do not care about you. You a just another driver.

    Advice to Management

    Do better.


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