Wiley Employee Reviews about "no room"

Updated Feb 18, 2020

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3.4
59%
Recommend to a Friend
77%
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Wiley President and Chief Executive Officer 	Brian Napack (no image)
Brian Napack
161 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "Constant restructure with no benefit, feels just like it's upper management trying to make a mark and then move on(in 40 reviews)

  • "Employee loyalty is thrown out of the window, low pay, predictable and no room for growth(in 26 reviews)

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Reviews about "no room"

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  1. "Sales Support in Customer service Department"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Global Sales Support in Hoboken, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great Place to work, in terms of life/work balance.

    Cons

    No room for growth and lost of restructuring

  2. Helpful (6)

    "Program Manager"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Maitland, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The people you worked with and work life balance

    Cons

    New ownership no room for growth lots of lay offs

    Continue reading

    Wiley Response

    Director

    It is definitely not the intention of anyone to burn out employees and I'm worry if you've experienced burnout. In fact, as you said in the "pro" section we take great pride in offering a positive work/life balance! Thanks for taking the time to leave a review.


  3. "Publishing world"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hoboken, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    work/life balance better than most

    Cons

    workload is overwhelming with no support, upper management says they want to hear from you, but really they don't want to hear the negative, because you are perceived as disgruntled or a complainer. removal of layers has left no room for career advancement

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  4. Helpful (11)

    "STEER CLEAR OF WILEY!"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Senior Program Manager in Oak Brook, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Wiley for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Benefits and salary, if you're one of those people willing to sell your self-worth for those things.

    Cons

    Literally everything. Everyone is in the same boat of misery and exhaustion of being overworked, underappreciated, and micromanaged, yet having an opinion will get you fired. There is no room to grow in the company unless you are a male, preferably without children. The jobs themselves require little talent and have become automated and scripted, much like that of a for-profit environment which Deltak used to pridefully rise above. I have never seen a company turn so quickly with such a lack of loyalty to follow suit with the absurd changed.

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  5. Helpful (7)

    "Acquisitons editor"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hoboken, NJ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Colleagues are very supportive and willing to share their knowledge. Employees want to help the company move forward.

    Cons

    No room for advancement and a sense that there is no support from senior management. Through downsizing historical knowledge is gone.

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  6. Helpful (13)

    "Basically a dead end job"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    There is a good work life balance, a lot of PTO days and the chance to work from home every so often.

    Cons

    The company doesn't have its priorities straight. They'd rather invest in redesigning the building than keep 120 full-time employees. There is also no room for growth in most departments and pay is very low even in the publishing industry

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  7. Helpful (8)

    "RUN AWAY!"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    working 35h a week, location, cafeteria

    Cons

    management, salaries, lack of projects, no room for growth

  8. "Program Manager"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     

    I worked at Wiley

    Pros

    pleasant environment and always training and forever changes.

    Cons

    No room for career development

  9. Helpful (30)

    "Squandered Potential"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Wiley full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Reasonably big player across a number of segments: education, research and professional development. A very different mix from other publishers who specialize in only one or two of segments. Traditionally run as separate businesses but will be a powerful combination if the company manages to get these businesses to work together. The potential for something great is there. Wiley family still active in the company. It’s clear that the recently retired chairman, Peter Wiley, cares about the benefit the company brings to the world. Members of the family are also very approachable and know what must be thousands of employees by their first name. Very different style from your typical media dynasty. Management is well-intentioned, or at least appears to be so. They hit the right notes, anyway. New CEO is a much better communicator than the last one. He has created a more compelling vision. He has a record for making tough choices -- in other words recognizing trade-offs are a key part of good strategy. The previous regime failed to acknowledge what wasn’t working, was poor at picking executive talent, was horribly indecisive, and defunded critical activities to fund (well, underfund) new initiatives. But at least they were aware of the external challenges facing the company. The regime before that had their head in the sand and wouldn’t react to a changing environment. So the new CEO that combines and awareness of the external environment, acknowledgement of our own problems, and a more compelling vision, is a welcome change. Very good at generating revenue in a challenging market. I have no idea how the sales team does it with an ever thinning product line and constant organizational change. And the new leadership is much better at setting targets that are realistic in the current environment. International and high-impact. For a multinational of its small size – only 5,000 – it touches the lives of a lot of people and has an active presence in many countries If you are an investor, over the short term Wiley is a great place to be. In addition to generating revenue, the company has been cutting costs and spending heavily on stock buybacks and spitting out larger dividends. This isn’t without serious long term affects, though, as covered under the cons. It’s a great place to learn how *not* to manage change. I’m not saying this to be sarcastic or mean. As you grow the course of your career into higher levels of management – whether in Wiley or somewhere else – examples of bad leadership and management can be just as instructive as good ones. I feel I’ve learned a lot about what *not* to do, be it communication, strategy, restructuring, setting accountability, talent management, etc.

    Cons

    While life at Wiley has the potential to get better, this is how it feels now: Low morale: Following numerous lay-offs, many of those who stayed yearn to get severance. I’ve encountered people throughout all levels of the company, most highly competent, that long to be let go, and envy those that have moved on to roles outside Wiley. This is a definite change from the past. You get the sense that nobody wants to be here (with the exception of higher-level executives). But people keep going through the motions, either out of habit or until something better comes along. Overwhelming sense of inertia: There is a growing feeling that Wiley can’t do anything right when it comes to technology. Despite ambitious executive recruitment and heavy spending, major client-facing platforms are mid-2000s level at best, while much of the company’s infrastructure is 90s or even earlier. You learn to ignore any pronouncements about future improvements, because we’ve seen deadlines missed repeatedly – not by months, but years while the final deliverable is always a pale reflection of the original vision. This failed investment in technology has had ripple effects, hiring freezes chief among them. Imagine being asked to deliver something new, that customers will love, with no technology or manpower investment. Or being asked to out-compete and build market share against very aggressive competitors with limp content acquisition plans. Or being asked to secure new business with a thinning product line sitting on outdated, crumbling platforms. And you know this situation won’t change for years to come. Some days I just sit at my desk, stare into the middle distance, and sigh. No room to grow: This has been discussed repeatedly in other reviews on this site. I see the problem less as “no room to move up” as “no room to learn new things.” Throughout the company there are people with over a decade of experience doing entry-level work because the company has been so tight-fisted in hiring support staff. Instead of working out in the field, talking to customers, people are fiddling with paperwork. People hesitate to take on new projects that might stretch their abilities, because they are already working overtime to keep up with a growing admin workload. Lack of meritocracy: While favoritism was always an issue at Wiley, recent restructurings have exacerbated the problem. Not a month goes by without a surprise termination of someone widely respected and the promotion of someone widely seen as a poor choice. Even more surprising given the failure of the previous leadership, groomed for years for reasons unobvious to the rest of the company. You really begin to question to judgment of top executives and the board. Another facet of this a certain “class” system that is becoming more evident. If you are at a high enough level, misbehavior and poor judgment that would get lower level people fired are tolerated and excused. Bad change management – Wiley can’t seem to get the speed of change right. Either it drags on, causing major disruption, or they move too quickly without considering possible pitfalls. I’m willing to chalk this up to organization learning to change, but often the way it’s handled creates unnecessary anxiety. Plans are characterized by “managed transparency,” where the leadership proclaims “there will be change, but we don’t know what it is. We are being transparent by letting you know we don’t know what it is. But whatever we decide, we will treat everybody with dignity and respect. ” Repeat that statement for the next six months. Then add whispers about a forthcoming announcement at the end of the month. Watch as the announcement deadline and more restated announcement deadlines pass by over the course of another three months. When the big announcement comes, it will almost certainly raise more questions than it answers, typically because it will only list the top line management, and the names of their newly formed silos. Then watch as the newly installed management team breaths a collective sigh of relief. If they are in a good-enough mood, they might even make a video! Skeptical of internal talent -- with the exception of a select anointed few, leadership at Wiley often demonstrates skepticism of the abilities of internal hires and tends to go with external candidates. I suspect a number of reasons for this. First is the bad track record the company has had with grooming Peter-principle successors who have flamed out. Second, as mentioned above, it is difficult for people to grow or learn new skills if they are burdened with busy-work. Third, management is likely aware of the poor job the company is doing at training and growing new talent. They make of show of hiring learning and development people in HR, and doing the occasional class, but development needs to happen at the coal-face between managers and employees or with new projects, yet many people having trouble just trying not to get sunk by their existing workloads. Forth, the past few restructurings have seen the forced departure of incredible talent. Either the company has no faith in ability of existing Wiley employees to grow, or doubts the company’s own ability to help them develop into new roles. Amid all this, it’s hard to ignore the irony of a self-proclaimed “ learning organization” not bothering to support colleagues’ learning and growth. This skepticism manifest in a number of other ways. For example, heavy reliance on consultants to tell management what people in the organization already know. Another, starving market-facing functions like editorial and sales of resources, while funding desk-based market research groups to “understand the voice of the customer.” Of course nothing can be done with the research they produce since the company isn’t willing to invest, and can’t invest effectively. And only recently have they started rolling out a CRM so that client-facing roles can feed back important information. This is after discussing the idea for over a decade and rolling out in fairly limited fashion due to costs. Double-speak – so the above is one example: a learning organization, with plenty of learning solutions and tools, not bothering to eat its own dogfood and grow employees’ careers. There are others. Talk about breaking down silos while creating new ones in certain businesses or geographies. Approving strategic plans, but then not funding those plans with headcounts or other investment (the CEO recently acknowledged this is a problem, which was good to see). Questions about the future: the company is trying to change its trajectory but in the process they have depleted the content pipeline and generated little return on their technology investment. Management appears to go through successive restructurings to simply buy time – a slight-of-hand shell game where different strategic solutions are proposed to solve Wiley’s problems, when it’s really always been execution that is Wiley’s weakness.

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  10. Helpful (12)

    "Too many managers, not enough leaders"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Manager 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Wiley full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - Great benefits package - Worked with some really great people, but most left for better opportunities.

    Cons

    - Won't allow remote work unless you're in a leadership position. Get with the program, it's 2015! - Absolutely no room for advancement. Too many people in management roles who never leave (and who should!). - Team members are not empowered to do their work. Everything moves slowly and it takes 5 - 10 people to make a decision. You can't work like that in the digital climate if you want to succeed. - Managers are dictators, not leaders. - Restructure after restructure with no sign of relief. Change in management every 6 months without any say in what team you'll be moved to. Doesn't create a positive work environment. - Way too much favoritism in leadership team, so those who are friends with management, get the job they want and the most "power," and trust me, they wield their power often. - Lots of micro-managing by management. - So many useless meetings during the week. So many. - There are too many people in "leadership and management" positions that the hierarchy of the org chart is completely skewed and imbalanced. Cut some of those upper management roles and bring in some talented people (not fresh out of college) to bring some life back into the company. - Many on the leadership team are really out of touch with the product and/or the consumer.

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Found 26 reviews