Xerox Business Analyst Reviews | Glassdoor

Xerox Business Analyst Reviews

Updated June 14, 2017
68 reviews

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Business Analyst

2.8
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Xerox CEO Jeff Jacobson
Jeff Jacobson
1 Rating

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Pros
Cons
  • Historic work life balance, when I had first child (in 94 reviews)

  • There are no raises even if you change positions (in 195 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Xerox"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Norwalk, CT
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Norwalk, CT
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Xerox (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Given the ability to learn a lot about the equipment and software you sell. Fun environment to work within. Xerox is a very strong team environment.

    Cons

    Company direction at times was muddy and unclear.

    Advice to Management

    Overall great job.


  2. "Great company to work in."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Systems Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Current Employee - Business Systems Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Xerox full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Wonderful considerate employees and a modern culture. Flexible work environment. Employees are provided the state-of-practice tools (e.g. corp laptops, WebEx) so they focus on their projects.

    Cons

    Office facilities are fine ... but nothing to write home about.

  3. "Business Systems Analsyt"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Systems Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Current Employee - Business Systems Analyst in Rochester, NY
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Xerox full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    *Great people to work with
    *Diverse workforce
    *Good culture overall

    Cons

    *Very disorganized process
    *Poor communication
    *Issues brought up are not taken seriously or don't go anywhere

    Advice to Management

    *Give clear expectations of your staff
    *Reduce middle management


  4. "Worked at Xerox for 4 years"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - LEAD SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT ANALYST/BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST in Holladay, UT
    Former Employee - LEAD SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT ANALYST/BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST in Holladay, UT

    I worked at Xerox (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Opportunity to learn a lot of new products. Worked on projects for fortune 500 companies.
    Worked with some incredibly smart people

    Cons

    Yearly furloughs, yearly lay off across the board. No raises for performance.


  5. Helpful (1)

    "Good place to work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Boston, MA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Xerox full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Local project was good. Good pay. Most of the people are very nice. Many opportunities.

    Cons

    The Client was not very nice when issues arose.

    Advice to Management

    Learn how to deal with a dynamic workforce.


  6. "Work"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Xerox full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Worked from Home, and paid on time

    Cons

    No guidance, no formal review in 2 years even though requested
    Constantly changing Management
    Moving work off Shore
    No investment in training or education for US workers
    Spending money on over seas and Mexico employees in form of PMP training and higher education


  7. Helpful (1)

    "Do It ... With a different company"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Phoenix, AZ
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Phoenix, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Xerox full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Learn new skills, you can move up if you're highly aggressive and manipulative, and if you're old

    Cons

    Antiquated or no management strategy, struggling to maintain relevance, the technology is lacking

    Advice to Management

    Get out, and tell everyone to get out before the place implodes

  8. Helpful (1)

    "ANYWHERE is better!"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Rosemont, IL
    Former Employee - Senior Business Analyst in Rosemont, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Xerox full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Some good and friendly people, who get overworked compensating for the many people who under perform without consequence. Not much else good I can say. Many are complaining about the transition of work to Guatemala for most positions outside of Rochester/Webster, NY, but this actually is solving the under performing people issue mentioned in the Cons section. The employees in the Guatemala office are eager to do their new jobs, SUPER friendly, and have actual performance-based incentives (actually mandated by Guatemalan law) to ensure they do their work well. I helped with the transition, including offshoring my own job before I left and found that to be the most rewarding work I had ever done at Xerox. I also got to travel overseas for the first time in my life, which was a blast. It was so refreshing to work with so many great people in Guatemala, where the office atmosphere isn't toxic (yet), and a handful of great people in the US, whom I still maintain regular contact with.
    **Thankfully, Ursula is stepping down and acknowledging her failures (at least sort of).

    Cons

    I’ve had trouble figuring out exactly where to start listing the cons.
    The company is in a complete tailspin, with the seriously failed merger with ACS being the latest indicator, and no clear direction, seemingly flailing about in the marketplace. The ACS merger failed because of a lack of corporate direction, not incompatibility between the companies. Xerox stopped merging the companies at a certain point, leaving duplicated HR (even the jobs site was different) systems, financial systems/staff, and barely a shared resource across either company. It sat that way for 5 years, before they finally resumed the merger, completing the work JUST in time for the companies to be forced apart by the board 6 years after the merger was announced. Karl Icahn would have been wrong only if the companies had actually merged 6 years ago, but he was correct in forcing the issue.
    Don’t mistake the ACS acquisition as the only or largest issue facing Xerox, it’s simply the most outwardly visible symptom of a cancer that’s already metastasized and is killing the company from the inside out.
    **They think they’re a market “leader”, but confuse being its biggest player with being its leader. It’s been decades since this company actually led the industry, allowing other companies to set the direction, then applying a 2 year+ long (considered quick/tactical in Xerox terms) effort to move in and claim dominance in those areas. All of their competitors are first/second/third to market with initiatives, while Xerox haphazardly creates flawed plan after flawed plan, mired by toxic office politics to compete externally after the marketplace is established.
    **The higher you go within Xerox, the more toxic the environment becomes, as every department is fiercely territorial and refuses to actually work with any other related department to deliver a shared service to the customer or to develop shared infrastructure/processes together. The executive management team openly sabotages projects from other departments, even when the project has no impact on their work, simply because they don’t want another group to outperform theirs.
    **Nearly all of the company strategy and direction is a secret that’s not shared with anyone below “executive” levels, but management pretends there is complete transparency. What little “transparency” there is, usually consists of a mixture of half-truths, misinformation/misrepresented facts, and outright lies. Experienced people can read between the lines and figure things out, however, but that only leads to the distrust that almost all employees have.
    **What little corporate strategy there seems to be appears to consist of purchase a company that does one specific thing, then “insource” Xerox work to the purchased company (literally a headcount shell game). This happened with what used to be the real HR when Xerox purchased Buck HR Solutions and then eliminated HR, to use their own useless HR contractor. The only reason Xerox isn’t “outsourcing” work, is because they purchased ACS, which Xerox has been steadily sending all Xerox work to, mostly in Guatemala. Now that ACS is becoming its own company again, Xerox is taking all of the ACS employees who are doing Xerox work, so they spent a lot of money to accomplish nothing.
    **There are some people, primarily those in Rochester or Webster, NY, who are apparently able to drink the Kool-Aid and seem to actually believe the company line and also believe the CEO isn’t a complete elitist that expresses the utmost disdain/disgust for all of the employees beneath her.
    **Sales people have always felt trodden on, but they honestly have no idea how the company treats everyone who is NOT in sales. Sales is clearly the next favorite member of the family after the CEO and executive team and everyone else can just enjoy the scraps.
    **The CEO has rarely even paid lip-service respect to the employees and usually just shows outright disgust for the people she clearly feels are simply ignorant, privileged, spoiled, and entitled minions. Her feelings are clear, not only in what she says, but HOW she says it (her tone says more than her words).
    **There are many under performing people who have no interest in doing more than the bare minimum of their jobs, if even that much. There is seriously poor management in most areas (with some very rare exceptions), who are more interested in playing office political games than in actually getting work done or making real improvements.
    **Extreme favoritism and no end to the political game play.
    **There is NO HR staff onsite, and management point-blank told employees to stop contacting corporate HR reps, explaining that HR isn’t there to handle concerns/issues/questions/guidance for employees, but rather the management team in dealing with the employees (basically the rare hiring and frequent firing/layoff of employees). They, instead, tell you to talk to your manager about HR issues or to call an 800 number, staffed by people who have no real information about any of the company’s HR policies.
    **SEVERELY low pay, versus comparable jobs in the same market, that is, unless you're (again) in Webster/Rochester, NY. Those locations have a lower cost of living than Chicago, but, not exaggerating, almost twice the pay of the same job in Chicago/Rosemont. The company, however, will flat out tell employees that their pay is on par with the marketplace. $42k as a project manager is not normal in Chicago, nor is $45k as a business analyst (a co-worker was making only $38k in the same position!).
    **Raises are described as "merit-based", but when raise time comes (every couple of years now), they give the same 2-3% raise to all employees across the board, regardless of performance. The last couple of rounds were closer to 2% than 3%. I believe my last raise was only 2.3%.
    **The company’s benefits package has steadily been eroded, with even small perks that were temporarily removed becoming permanent removals (like the tradition of having birthdays off work every year); just ask Ursula about this and watch as her facial expression turns from a smile to disgust and she will proceed to explain to you that it’s not a “privilege” and you’re not “entitled” to having that benefit (despite the prior 50+ years of that being a perk). Thankfully, Ursula is stepping down and acknowledging her failures (at least sort of).
    **Ursula has always cited company performance as her reasoning for cutting employee benefits or not giving raises, but that’s usually right after she finishes explaining that the company is performing at or above expectations AND that the shareholders are getting a dividend, plus all executives are getting bonuses, so… hmmm… Great performance actually means happy shareholders AND cutting benefits to the employees (unhappy employees).
    **I guess I’ll stop here. Don’t work here. Under any circumstance.

    Advice to Management

    Seriously, there isn't any advice that they would actually take action on, so don't bother. Most are so inept that they wouldn't be able to figure out that they're actually the problem and that the solution is actually their termination. Clean the slate from executive levels on up and start over. The real issue is a lack of vision and a near allergic reaction to teamwork. Also, continue to move work to Guatemala, where the workforce and management team is positive and not infected *yet* by the cancer of Xerox North America.


  9. "Business Systems Consulting Sr. Analyst"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Business Systems Consulting Senior Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Former Employee - Business Systems Consulting Senior Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    interesting challenges, some gifted talent within the company. diversity in work activities made sure I wasn't bored. There is great potential for business growth. At a high level, the company has great aspirations and provides good benefits.

    Cons

    Growth potential is not consistent, communication overload causes confusion... I found the environment not be be very supportive of women and at times, it was a hostile place to work despite clearly documented policy to the contrary. Corporate values don't seem to trickle down past middle management...possibly lack of leadership at a higher level or a reflection of societal issues as a whole. I would not recommend a friend or loved one to work here at this time.

    Advice to Management

    Focus, find your corporate identity and get back to the basics of caring for your customer and employees. Follow through and hold management teams accountable for the values you espouse.


  10. "Business Analyst"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Business Systems Analyst in Richmond, VA
    Former Contractor - Business Systems Analyst in Richmond, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Xerox as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Provides a flexible work schedule

    Cons

    Unstable working environment and atmosphere

    Advice to Management

    Be more forthcoming with candidates on job stability as it relates to maintaining and acquiring contracts for business