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Yelp Employee Reviews about "business owners"

Updated Jan 22, 2021

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Found 246 of over 3K reviews

3.4
54%
Recommend to a Friend
74%
Approve of CEO
Yelp Co-Founder & CEO Jeremy Stoppelman
Jeremy Stoppelman
1,702 Ratings
Pros
  • "Fun culture, free food, good money(in 277 reviews)

  • "Amazing culture and great people(in 199 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "Uphill battle having to constantly convince business owners that Yelp is not this corrupt monster of a company(in 248 reviews)

  • "All cold calls, lots of burnout(in 80 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
    Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

    Ratings by Demographics

    This rating reflects the overall rating of Yelp and is not affected by filters.

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    Reviews about "business owners"

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    1. 5.0
      Former Employee

      Yelp is what you make it

      Nov 24, 2020 - Account Executive in New York, NY
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      It's a good place to see what you really want to do, gives you a backbone in life

      Cons

      Cold calls, talking to business owners who have never used a phone

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    2. 3.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      The job is what you make it.. to an extent

      Jan 19, 2021 - Account Executive in New York, NY
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      -The culture was great(free food in kitchen, benefits, mostly young people, LGBTQ+ friendly, lots of happy hours and team outings) -Opportunities to make money(Compared to other sales job, earning a decent base with the ability to make commission is always nice) -Work life balance(Upper Management respects hard work but doesn't push you to stay late, in fact they encourage people to leave when the work day is done)

      Cons

      -Cold Calling sales(That's the job.. nothing more, nothing less. No matter how management wants to sugarcoat it, it's a grind) -Territory luck(If your territory is a major urban area where there are simply more yelp users, it will be easier to convince business owners to buy ads. Management will say that no matter where your territory is, you can make 40K in revenue monthly, but that's simply just not true, and they know it too.) -Some nepotism(Managers seem to say who gets what territory is dependent on luck to an extent, but they can choose who gets where. If they simply like/dislike a person, that will dictate who gets what territory. People should be rewarded on a mix of revenue/effort.)

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    3. 2.0
      Former Employee, less than 1 year

      Kelly Clarkson - "Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You)"

      Aug 28, 2019 - Account Executive in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      I apologize if my review is lengthy. I wanted to give as much detail about my experience as possible. Hopefully, my review helps someone. My review is only focused on what I experienced during my time with Yelp, things may have changed since. I was employed by Yelp in the Chicago office from the summer of 2018 to February 2019. I can confidently say it was one of the worst times of my life. My experiences at Yelp mirror a lot of what has already been noted by former and current employees. I, like so many, was grateful to get the call that I had gotten an offer. The thought of working for such a large, well-known tech company was exciting. However, there's a clear distinction, YOU don't work in tech, you work in sales. Welcome to your career. I did not study business or any related major that would lead me to a career in sales. I think most people who end up in sales don't grow up thinking, "I can't wait to cold-call people when I'm older." I had worked in another sales role at another company for about a month where the daily metrics/key performance indicators (KPIs) were 200+ cold-calls, 100+ emails, etc. So, learning that Yelp "only" required about 70 to 80 calls a day and 25 emails was a dream. THAT'S WHERE THEY GET YOU (But more on that later)! In the Chicago office, the BASE is $39,000 (before taxes). Why not $40,000? No one knows. To me, a single twenty-something with no kids, this was enough to afford my modest lifestyle. You will have access to a wellness benefit that can cover your gym membership. Use it. You also receive benefits from day one, which is cool, but not super rare for tech companies and startups. "Plus" there's the possibility of earning commission (But more on that later).

      Cons

      They typically start people on the second week of the month. So that summer, I along with over 90 other people started our career with Yelp. By the time I left the company, a third of my summer group remained. I didn't necessarily see the high number of new hires as a red flag. I figured maybe they wanted to just knock out training for such a large group at once. I came to realize there is such a high turnover with resignations and firings that it's necessary to hire in such high volume. Training is classroom style for two months. The first two months of employment are the most decent. The first week is solely classroom learning and by week two, you're on the phones and "ready" to go! What they don't tell you in the interview (I asked to be sure, given my prior experience at that other company) is about recycled leads. A recycled lead is a lead that has been contacted by prior reps. In some cases, leads have been getting called since 2013. You can imagine they are super excited to hear from Yelp, AGAIN! I understand that in sales, you will have recycled leads, that's a part of the industry. Maybe the prior salesperson didn't sell the product right and this is YOUR chance to say something different to change their mind. Sure, but no, not at Yelp. There is a script (not unlike most sales roles). That's pretty much all the sales language you get. If you come into the role with some experience, you will have a much better time on the phone. If you're pretty much new to sales, good luck. Yelp uses the same exact script for every single business. Calling a contractor? Nail salon? Psychic? Use the script. If you ask your manager (more on that) for valuable feedback or insight on how to approach a certain lead you are not going to get it. Yelp places new hires on teams of about ten. These teams are given a manager who is also in training. YOUR MANAGER IS BEING TRAINED ON HOW TO BE A MANAGER WHILE YOU ARE BEING TRAINED ON HOW TO BE A SALESPERSON. While the job itself is awful, this can truly make or break your experience. If your manager has had previous managing experience, they may actually be able to assist you on your calls. That's often not the case. Most managers are extremely young, which can be a good thing. These are the people that came straight out of undergrad to Yelp, worked as a rep for 1 1/2 to 2 years and then became a manager trainee. Also, it should be noted there is no real trajectory in this role. You work as a Sales Rep for about a year and if you do well you may become a rep for the Mid-Market or National team. Which just means a different volume of cold-calling. Or you could work a year and become a manager in training to manage other people who cold-call. If you survive all of that for years, you may get to be a director. Tough luck if you're a minority though (at least in the Chicago office). Diversity is kind of a problem and an eyesore. There is a "Wall of Fame" where reps who have closed/sold a certain number get their photo (poorly) photoshopped to a European monarch portrait. This is problematic in itself but the only person of color, a Black man, has the smallest photo on this wall. His face is photoshopped onto the iconic "Napoleon Crossing the Alps" and you can barely make out his tiny face in the painting. There are no directors of color and there are few managers of color as well. The overall aesthetic of the office is young, white recent graduates. The environment is very much like a fraternity/sorority house. It can be very cliquey but you will most likely make friends. The people that work alongside you are generally nice, management and leadership are the people to watch out for. You will bond with your friends over how terrible the job is. However, if you leave and they are still employed with Yelp, you will likely not remain friends. Being friends with someone still employed at Yelp is like looking at your friend claim to be “happy” in an abusive relationship. The environment is one of the worst parts of this role. If you have ever experienced any forms of anxiety or depression, you will definitely be triggered. If you are a recovering alcoholic, your sobriety will be challenged. This office has beer kegs (very much like other tech companies). There are "off-site" events that your manager can plan, which basically means go to a bar and drink. You're basically shamed if you don't want to go to these events. On my particular director group, there was an incentive called "Lunch Club." The first six reps to get to 25k in a month get to have Rosé with the director. This office encourages alcoholism as a coping mechanism for the high stress of the job. They blast music loudly, which doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Please be prepared to hear the same songs every day, sometimes more than one time in a day. I heard Clean Bandit & Zara Larsson's "Symphony" three times in one day. It's a mediocre song at best, imagine being stressed and getting yelled at by business owners, and having to hear "SYMPHONNNNYYYYYYYYYY," multiple times a day. They also played Kelly Clarkson's "Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You)" daily, how fitting. I'm afraid you're wrong Ms. Clarkson, what doesn't kill you just slowly eats away at you. Reps are given a territory (some have geographic regions) which basically has two areas or cities. In my time there, I went from Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada) & rural Kansas, to Mt. Rushmore, South Dakota & rural Nebraska, to Garland, Texas & Suburban Chicago. These changes happened in six months. You can imagine how frustrating it is to constantly change territories, especially to go from a decent metropolitan area to a tourist attraction that has closed for the season. All reps are treated equal in regards to their assigned territory. It doesn't matter if you have New York City or San Francisco or rural Alabama. You are expected to meet the same KPIs and quota as everyone. Work starts at 8:30 am sharp. If you have a territory in a different time zone as you, oh well. You're still expected to start dialing, even if businesses are closed. I have never been so micro-managed in my life. You're expected to make 80 dials in a day, get 2 pitches (a pitch is when you run through the entire script with a business owner and show them pricing), and close one deal. If you get to lunch time with no pitches, expect your manager to sit down and look at every SINGLE dial you made. Yelp uses Salesforce which gives them multiple reports which allow them to track everything you do, which of course is necessary but it is overused. My manager would sit and say, "You called this restaurant at 10:00 am on Monday, and you called at 11:00 today, did you leave a voicemail? Are you sending an email with every call?" If you get a voicemail when you call a business, you are expected to leave a message and send an email. Imagine calling someone about 6 to 7 times in two weeks (the sales cycle) and leaving the same message and sending poorly constructed email templates. It's harassment. We are encouraged not to use the Do Not Call (DNC) feature in Salesforce. Even if a business owner says, “Please stop calling me! I am NOT interested,” because they didn’t explicitly say “please add me to you Do Not Call list,” you must continue to call and email them. The product doesn't work. Maybe it did a few years ago but the advertising landscape has changed. There are much cheaper and efficient options out there, e.g. Instagram Ads, Facebook Boost Post/Ads, Google Ads. So, trying to tell a hip young nail artist that her Instagram page with 20,000 followers is not as good as a Yelp page is pointless. I have had customers call and complain to me about the product not working. Luckily, I'm a decent human-being, I didn’t over promise like some of the more successful reps do. This role will really mess with your integrity. If you're calling into a rural area, you will feel like crap for forcing a platform on someone who doesn't need it, just to get a sale. Thankfully, there are no contracts, so people can cancel anytime. This will affect your commission should you ever get over that threshold. Reps are only eligible for commission after closing 30k. After that, each month they must reach at least 12k in order to start earning commission. So, you have to close 42k for Yelp before you receive your first commission check of about $120. Commission is paid out separately from your normal salary and also taxed. Most people don’t make it long enough to see commission. Those who do well will note that their commission checks will be affected as their customers cancel their plans. Yelp billed out commission for six months. The highest you could close a business on was a deal worth $540 a month. Yelp assumed they would advertise for six months. $540 X 6 = $3,240 or 3.24k. You would have to close about thirteen “full-comp” deals before you get your first commission check. Of course, there were cheaper plans that would allow for smaller amounts. But reps are really encouraged to push business owners towards spending fifteen dollars a day (or more) so they can get the full-sized deal. Most people stop advertising after realizing the product doesn’t work. It’s cost-per-click (CPC) and does not guarantee any customers. If a contractor has a $23.00 CPC and someone is shopping around for a contractor getting multiple quotes and viewing multiple businesses (like most people do when shopping around). Yelp will charge that business for each click even if it did not result in a job. Because they paid for the “exposure.” When and if you are closing a deal, you have to tell business owners that you will stay in touch with them if they have any questions about their advertising “campaign.” However, my manager encouraged my teammates and I to not answer the phone for customers or to simply give them the inbound support number. This was common practice throughout the office. Once, I sat on a phone with a business owner for thirty minutes and listened to their complaints, they were charge over four-hundred dollars and didn’t get a single client. What are you supposed to say to a small business owner? I simply said, “I’m sorry.” I felt awful and dirty. There is an in-house barista but every drink they have is acidic tasting and quite frankly, they’re rude (I suppose it’s because they are only paid minimum wage). Reps are encouraged to consume copious amounts of espresso to “keep the energy up.” There is also free food in the two kitchens. However, it’s mostly prepackaged food full of preservatives and nitrates. Good luck grabbing a Walmart Ready-Pac salad or frozen hamburger because all employees take their lunch at 12:00 pm. The office has between 650 - 800 people, give or take firings/hiring/resignations. The two kitchens are like war zones. You spend your hour lunch break waiting twenty minutes to use one of the six microwaves. But while you’re waiting for your first check or you’re in-between checks, the food is helpful. Just make sure in between enjoying free coffee, food, and soft-drinks, you don’t use the bathroom too often. Your manager will constantly want to know where you are. There is the option to do overtime, it's not mandatory, but boy if it’s the last day of the month (LDOM) and you’re leaving at 5:30, expect a dirty look. I witnessed the top performer on my team and one of the top performers in my entire group break down in tears. Management took this happy and bright twenty-two-year-old girl and broke her. What can I, a twenty-seven-year-old who has multiple jobs, say to a young girl in her first role? Recent grads are the target demographic for hiring because they are the most vulnerable. They don’t know that a work environment isn’t supposed to be (this) toxic. Another peer on my team had a nervous breakdown (on his birthday), he was also fired a week later (not a lie or embellishment). In fact, in a week’s time, my former team lost five people, three were fired and two quit (another rep and myself). Work isn’t supposed to be “easy” but it shouldn’t be this hard. My manager and director would simply tell reps who were unhappy that they are not trying hard enough. In fact, my director sent out an email with an article about the health benefits of stress. This is an individual who would have group meetings with all the teams under his leadership just to yell at them. He would constantly walk around the floor and scream at people if they looked unhappy. You will be forced to stand up for “power-hours” and no, Yelp does not provide standing desks. In addition to possibly earning commission, you can earn other perks such as McDonalds breakfast sandwiches, Starbucks or Dunkin' Donuts coffee, an off-site with your team to go drink, taking a picture with a musty jersey, or “bragging” rights. So basically, nothing. You will gain or lose weight, depending on how your body handles stress. You will constantly get sick; the stress will make it hard for your immune system. You will age, a year in this role and you will look older and more tired. You will lose motivation to do anything, even on weekends. It will be hard to imagine life before Yelp. Leaving the company has given me such clarity. While applying for other roles, I was given a writing assignment that took me way longer than it should have. I realized that in the months I’d been employed at Yelp, I hadn’t really used my brain for critical thinking. So, after all this you’re still interested in working at Yelp. Best of luck, welcome to your career.

      180 people found this review helpful

      Yelp Response

      We appreciate your thoughtful and thorough feedback on your experience at Yelp. We're deeply sorry that your time with us was not what you expected. The things you've mentioned in your review are very far from the experience and overall work culture we work so hard to create here, and its unfortunate that your experience was negative. We go to great lengths during our interview process to set expectations on the challenges of the role, as we never want to spring surprises on anyone on day one. Many tenured employees at Yelp truly enjoy their jobs and find that the continuous challenge is inspiring and helps them grow their skill sets. We understand that this environment might not be for everyone, and in some cases, can be overwhelming. We wish we would have had the opportunity to hear your concerns during your time here, and we wish you only the best in the next step of your career. Thank you for your time with us, we will pass along your feedback to our leadership team so we can continue to make Yelp a great place to work.

    4. 1.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      Trash company

      Jan 13, 2021 - Account Executive in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Not a one. Maybe the free granola and what we called 'cancer burritos' available in the kitchen. Essentially kindergarten paste wrapped in a wet paper towel and needed to be doused with sauce to mask the nauseating flavour. Honestly I would have rather eaten my left foot, raw.

      Cons

      Everything - they will try to liquify your brain and fill it with fanciful ideas of success and capital gain. It's all a ploy, it's all a charade to mask coke problems, infidelity, and deceit. Forcing you to call poor unfortunate business owners day after day until you're comically being screamed at by a sunflower farmer in Lawrence, Kansas who is desperately seeking solace from the Yelp onslaught. Truly nightmarish. This job is ideal for lost souls, the truly cruel, or anyone looking to investigate corporate mind control at its most base.

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      1 person found this review helpful

      Yelp Response

      This review is tough to read. Experiences like this are not representative of the environment we work so hard to create for our employees. Every employee deserves to come to work knowing that they will be valued, heard, and appreciated, and we are deeply sorry that this wasn't the case for you. We will pass along your feedback to our leadership team so that we can continue to make Yelp a great place to work. We're thankful for your time with us and wish you the best of luck in the next step of your career.

    5. 2.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      So complex a lot of good people, terrible job, and some really bad management

      Jan 15, 2021 - Account Executive in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      There are a lot of good people who are mainly AES that work at Yelp and genuinely care about you and want to help in any way. It is nice to be in an environment and culture that is more free with no forced suit and tie attached. Below I had to censor names and how I really feel but just know there’s a reason Yelp is so massively disliked and has such high turnover. So many employees past and present are right in their negative feedback for it and if you’ve worked at yelp as only a rep you’ll most likely agree.

      Cons

      God where do I start? How much time you guys have?! Well the job itself will make you unhappy. Seriously damaging to your self worth getting rejected every day trying to sell a product to a vast majority of clientele that understandably dislikes Yelp. Yelp is has lied of being to business owners with reps who cheat to close. Plenty of top reps get praise from office head directors like but it so fake and circumstantial. Most cheat like a guy who was fired for cheating . Of course plenty of people kissed his behind because he was closing 70k a month but CHEATING.!!! Directors would also use him as an example to stop complaining and close more. Just made her look bad once he was exposed for cheating by another rep and fired. Some managers are good but some are grossly overrated whose own reps have had to pull them into a meeting to tell them they are not managing their own team well. A managers true ability is measured by what their reps think of them. Some managers have the maturity of a toddler and too emotional to manage. They micromanages at best and just takes up space at worst. One manger I knew is very fake nice and talks tons of crap about reps they don’t like. It’s funnier because most of their reps don’t like or respect them at all as a person not even a manager. I’ve witnessed plenty who also are nice to face and I have to censor my language for Glassdoor but lets say are not fond of them behind closed doors. The culture at yelp can also be weird and cult like. They want you feel like it’s the best place in the world to work and you’re lucky to be there but it’s really just a nice crash course in sales. Unless you’re a top rep and I mean booking at least 50k a month consistently then working there is a waste of time past a few years. An old coworker at Yelp best described it as a daycare. The job is just toxic to anyone’s mental health after George Floyd died and covid happens with massive layoff were told to just close and get over it. It’s really a company for immature kids who act like they’re in middle school and people who are trapped in a role they don’t want. Don’t get me wrong some people are great that work there and do great work and enjoy yelp and kudos god bless them. But the vast majority of employees at least 90% are waiting for the day to finally escape. Best of luck to any new people starting at yelp. Give it a year or two before you either want out or are apart of the rare 1% that is a top producer and stays since many top producers move on to better and more professional sales roles.

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      3 people found this review helpful
    6. 3.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      Good foot in the door, depending on manager

      Jan 14, 2021 - Inside Sales Representative in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      - Free food - Energetic office environment - Off-site events and beer on tap every day after work - You are in charge of your own success

      Cons

      - VERY metrics based... in the eyes of management, even if you are meeting/exceeding your quota, there's always something you could be doing better - Hard sell... you are contacting business owners who have been contacted by Yelp countless times. - Low base pay and no commission during ramp up time - Extremely hard to hit quota, especially in COVID times

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      Yelp Response

      Thank you for your feedback! We're happy to hear that Yelp was a great place to get your foot in the door and launch your career in sales. The managers at Yelp are devoted to the career growth of each individual here. Sometimes that can look like various one-on-one conversations throughout the day, and setting sales quotas that encourage people to continually improve. While this environment is inspiring for most, we understand that it may not be for everyone. Listening to the concerns of our employees is a crucial step to helping us improve Yelp for everyone, and we're thankful for your help with those efforts.

    7. 2.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      Eh

      Jan 16, 2021 - Senior Account Executive in Washington, DC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Good co workers, good training.. that’s about it

      Cons

      Product is horrible, micro managed regardless of performance, we get penalized for business owners cancelling a NON COMMITMENT PROGRAM that only works like 20% of the time, no upward mobility, low pay compared to other companies

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      Yelp Response

      Thank you for letting us know how things went during your time at Yelp. We're glad to hear you enjoyed your teammates and found the ongoing training valuable. We're sorry that your time here wasn't the best and that things could have gone much better. While we've made many changes and improvements based on the feedback from our clients and employees, we understand that there is room to grow and learn. Listening to the concerns of our employees is something we will continue to do to make sure we're doing all we can to support our people as best as possible. We're thankful you decided to share your thoughts with us and hope you've found another role that is more closely aligned with your expectations.

    8. 3.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      50/50 pros and cons

      Jan 19, 2021 - Account Manager in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Very laid back environment, stocked kitchen available to everyone, awesome coworkers

      Cons

      Sometimes it seemed like Yelp was too busy caring more about the users than the business owners which meant a lot of taxing days of getting yelled at by customers

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    9. 2.0
      Current Employee, more than 3 years

      It's treadmill job, you keep running but you really don't go anywhere.

      Oct 1, 2020 - Elite Account Executive in Chicago, IL
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Pretty much just the insurance and PTO currently.

      Cons

      There's really no innovation at Yelp every product we sell is something another company already created and Yelp copied. Business owners are struggling due to Covid and we're forced to nickel and dime them to keep our company afloat. There's a major lack of diversity in management roles. They email a lot of "symbolic gesture emails" about social issues but then you hear nothing more. Lack of communication between departments.

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      1 person found this review helpful
    10. 1.0
      Former Employee, more than 1 year

      Not worth it

      Jan 22, 2021 - Account Executive 
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Interesting people all from different backgrounds

      Cons

      Managers are ridiculous and ask too many questions about your personal life if you want to take a sick day Commission is very low Scamming business owners

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      Yelp Response

      Thank you for taking a moment to share your thoughts with us. It's great to hear that you enjoyed working with a diverse group of people at Yelp. This is truly an environment where everyone can bring their unique perspective to the table and be heard! We want to apologize that things didn't exactly go as planned. We encourage Yelp employees to take time off when they need it to rest and recharge. As long as employees have available PTO and are within our policies, they should feel comfortable asking for time off. Additionally, the Sales Development training that’s given to Account Executives during their first few weeks at Yelp teaches employees plenty of new skills. However, questionable work ethics and morals are not included in our sales playbook, nor do we tolerate this behavior at any time. Any additional details as to what happened can be sent to employeefeedback@yelp.com. We're thankful for your time with us, and wish you the best of luck in your next role.

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