ZOOM+Care Medical Provider Reviews | Glassdoor

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ZOOM+Care Medical Provider Reviews

Updated Dec 28, 2017

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1.5
0%
Recommend to a Friend
ZOOM+Care CEO Torben Nielsen
Torben Nielsen
0 Rating
  1. Helpful (16)

    "Dysfunction Abounds"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Medical Provider 
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at ZOOM+Care for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The schedule is great. You get 3.5 days a week off. More tenured providers who are grandfathered from the old system make decent pay (though not NDs, who summarily had their pay cut by 25% with less than a month's warning). You'll rarely see your manager.

    Cons

    The company is entirely profit-driven at the expense of good care. The only goal of management is to show a profit and attract investors. They hire a great team of MDs to support mid-level providers and advise management, then make sweeping changes to how we provide care without consulting (and sometimes without informing) them. As a provider you will be expected to see patients in 15 minutes regardless of their chief complaint and with few scheduled breaks. Your schedule will be supported by a remote team call center employees with no clinical experience who your assistant must instant message when you are behind in order to ask for a break in your schedule. They'll need to make a good case for you getting the break. If lawyering isn't their strength you may be out of luck. If the call center employees deem your situation desperate enough, your request will be granted. Your assistant may be great but s/he won't start this way because they receive very little training and have no clinical experience. You'll have one member of this team of underpaid (mostly) college graduates to provide all of your onsite support. They are responsible not just for assisting you but phlebotomy, insurance, inventory, and customer service. Not surprisingly assisting the provider often takes a back seat. You do your own vitals and often have to clean up your own exam room after procedures. Turnover is high. If you're lucky enough to have a good assistant for a year, you'll spend the first 2-3 months struggling as they learn on the job and the last month or two struggling as their animosity toward the company calcifies and they lose interest in their job. Work at a slow clinic? That sounds like less stress, right? You can spend more time with your patients and connect with people and remember why you got into medicine in the first place. NOPE. Management will hassle you about your visit duration, a metric they follow. You also may be asked to fill in at a busier clinic some days but won't be compensated as a float for your flexibility. Nonetheless, management will hassle you about building up your patient base, which is hard to do when your clinic has irregular hours. The system also doesn't support scheduling follow-ups beyond a few days. If you want to see a patient back after a month on his new asthma meds, you'll have to set up a reminder to email him. This is a theme, building up a practice is expected but you aren't given support in doing so. The middle managers who directly supervise you come mostly from retail. When they are schmoozing you over on the latest change to how you deliver your care you just know you're getting a variation of the pep talk some Victoria's Secret Assistant manager got when the new Angels collection came out in 2010. They have little respect for healthcare providers. I once heard one of them refer to a group of providers as "you girls." You might be asked to give feedback. Don't fall into this trap. For the most part this is a futile effort but those who are outspoken attract attention of middle management and not in a good way. If you choose to go down this road, extra attention will be paid to your metrics (timeliness, visit duration, revenue per visit, etc) and you will be singled out for having a bad attitude. You won't be given inside information on upcoming changes to the organization and compensation that might influence your clinic assignment requests. Upper management may be sincere in soliciting feedback but middle managers generally try to steer the conversation back to whatever they are there to sell you. Luckily, as noted above, they rarely have time to meet you since they manage so many providers and assistants.

    Continue reading
    ZOOM+Care2017-12-14
  2. Helpful (12)

    "You DO NOT want to work here"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Medical Provider 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at ZOOM+Care full-time

    Pros

    The schedule is the only good thing about working here.

    Cons

    No 401K matching, no paid holidays, and NO RAISES! A bonus plan that is ridiculously touted as a way to increase your income but if you do the math it actually results in less money overall (since they took away raises and put this in its place). It's very easy to burn out given that many providers see >25 patients per day, despite the fact that most are not comfortable doing so and believe it compromises patient safety and proper medical decision making. It appears that all ZoomCare cares about is making money. Constant changes to your signed contract. ZoomCare is allowed to make changes to your contract any time the mood strikes them but we are not allowed to, including not being allowed to quit without giving 120 days notice, which is ridiculous. Management is not supportive. Instead of actually listening to employees and working with them to find workable solutions to many of the company's problems, managers believe time is better spent posting passive-agrresive reviews on GlassDoor that make the company sound great and stress that if you have a negative attitude, you should just leave which is very unprofessional. Management has NO medical background/experience and is solely focused on profit margins. Providers are forced to ask anonymous, nom-medical employees for breaks when they're running behind, need to use the bathroom, run into their lunches with patients, etc. and often these interactions are condescending, aggressive and lead to further provider burnout, negativity and distrust in the company. Management picks and chooses who remains safe during inclement weather. Clinicians are forces to stay in clinics with NO patients scheduled but non-clinical employees are allowed to go home early because driving conditions are poor. Zoom uses terms like "Sarah" and "Emma" to refer to patients and employees, respectively. This, in addition to other zoomisms is ridiculous and quite frankly, a little cultish.

    Continue reading
    ZOOM+Care2017-12-28

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