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Career Development Tips

The Myers-Briggs Career Options

Posted by Glassdoor Team

Career Advice Experts

Last Updated June 29, 2021

Guide Overview

What is the Myers-Briggs career test? Personality types in the Myers-Briggs framework

Guide Overview

Using the Myers-Briggs test for your career

Frequently, the Myers-Briggs test is used to determine the personality of a professional and match them to a career that matches their strengths. Using this self-assessment tool to identify your personality type enables you to discover careers that are recommended for your type or learn about the professions preferred by others who share your type. Learning about the Myers-Briggs career recommendations can improve your chances of identifying a career path that works for you. Keep reading to learn more about this assessment, the personality types it identifies, and associated occupations.

What is the Myers-Briggs career test? 

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test, which can also be called the Myers-Briggs career test, is a personality test that identifies natural traits in people, such as introversion or extroversion, and classifies people into one of 16 personality clusters. Developed by a team comprised of a mother and daughter, Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers, this self-assessment tool has become a standard technique for understanding personalities and strengths. Additionally, it can match people to careers recommended for each cluster of traits or preferred by individuals with the same characteristics. You can complete the Myers-Briggs assessment in about 25 minutes by answering 93 questions. Each question relates to how you usually act in specific situations. Assuming you answer the questions honestly, your personality is assessed based on the following personality type dimensions and matched to one of the 16 clusters:

  • Extraversion or Introversion: While individuals whose personalities are extroverted are energized by their interactions with others, introverted people gain energy independently.
  • Intuitive or sensing: People whose personalities are categorized as intuitive are imaginative, prefer to see possibilities, and trust their intuition. In contrast, sensing personalities are realistic, prefer provable things, trust their experience, and make decisions based on facts.
  • Thinking or feeling: While a person who is defined as thinking tends to analyze situations, consider consequences, and make logical decisions, a feeling type considers people, tries to support others, and makes emotional decisions.
  • Judging or perceiving: While people with judging personalities plan ahead, those with perceiving traits are more spontaneous.

Learn more: Best Examples of Leadership Roles

Personality types in the Myers-Briggs framework

For each of the 16 personality types in this framework, we’ve listed several jobs based on Myers-Briggs personality test results:

Introverted, sensing, thinking, and judging (ISTJ) type

Typically, the personality strengths of ISTJ individuals include independence, practicalness, analytical thinking, and organization. These personalities are likely to value traditions and planning ahead. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Accountant
  • Tax examiner
  • Electrical engineer
  • Industrial engineer
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Air traffic controller
  • Aircraft mechanic
  • Pilot
  • Nuclear power reactor operator
  • Chief sustainability officer
  • Manager

Introverted, sensing, feeling, and judging (ISFJ) type

An ISFJ type is likely to be independent, practical, compassionate, steadfast, and goal-oriented. Due to these personality strengths, they tend to be successful in positions that require trustworthy, methodical workers who make fact-based decisions and consider everyone on their team. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Financial clerk
  • Accountant
  • Researcher
  • Teacher
  • Photographer
  • Film director
  • Business analyst
  • Registered nurse
  • Project manager
  • Physician
  • Politician
  • Manager

Learn more: Benefits and Examples of Teamwork in the Workplace

Introverted, sensing, thinking, and perceiving (ISTP) type

A professional with an ISTP personality type is likely to be able to work independently, be practical, think analytically, and make spontaneous decisions based on their understanding. Due to these strengths, these individuals usually have great skills in problem-solving and adaptability. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Police inspector
  • Computer technician
  • Industrial engineer
  • Researcher
  • Forensic scientist
  • Construction worker
  • Computer hardware developer
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Mechanic
  • Architect

Introverted, sensing, feeling, and perceiving (ISFP) type

Someone with an ISFP personality is likely to prefer working alone and making decisions based on facts. They tend to be enthusiastic and considerate of others. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Veterinary assistant
  • Nursing assistant
  • Computer technician
  • Telephone line installer
  • Electrical engineering technician
  • Fitness coach
  • Aerobics instructor
  • Fundraising manager
  • Driver

Introverted, intuitive, thinking, and judging (INTJ) type

An INTJ professional is likely to have personal strengths in the areas of independence, creativity, analytical thinking, and long-term planning. Due to these soft skills, these self-starters are likely to consider the big picture. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Plant and soil scientist
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Electrical engineer
  • Electrician
  • Industrial engineer
  • Computer engineer
  • Civil engineer
  • Management consultant
  • Chief sustainability officer
  • Top executive

Introverted, intuitive, feeling, and judging (INFJ) type

An individual with an INFJ personality will probably have several natural strengths, such as the focus needed to work without oversight, perceptiveness, consideration for others, and the drive to plan for the long-term. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Physician
  • Surgeon
  • Pathologist
  • Industrial engineer
  • Writer
  • Graphic designer
  • Art director
  • Interior designer
  • Surveyor
  • Researcher

Introverted, intuitive, thinking, and perceiving (INTP) type

These professionals are likely to be more intuitive, analytical, and spontaneous than average. A person with an INTP personality may also do their best work when working alone with minimal oversight. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Scientist
  • Researcher
  • Architect
  • Forester
  • Forestry worker
  • Carpenter
  • Editor
  • Writer
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Artist
  • Computer software developer
  • Computer hardware developer
  • Art director

Introverted, intuitive, feeling, and perceiving (INFP) type

A professional with an INFP personality is likely to have several strengths, such as the ability to work independently, an empathic understanding of others, the capability to nurture teams, and problem-solving skills. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Psychiatrist
  • Research assistant
  • Graphic designer
  • Artist
  • Writer
  • Art director
  • UX designer
  • Composer
  • Poet
  • Musician
  • Singer
  • Veterinarian
  • Veterinary assistant

Learn more: Strengths in the Workplace

Extroverted, sensing, thinking, and perceiving (ESTP) type

ESTP professionals are likely to be great team players with above-average attention to detail and problem-solving skills. They can also be practical, analytical, and focused on the short-term. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Bartender
  • Tax preparer
  • Tax inspector
  • Building inspector
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Driver
  • Loan officer
  • Automotive technician
  • Electrician
  • Firefighter

Extroverted, sensing, feeling, and perceiving (ESFP) type

The soft skills of an ESFP personality type are likely to include friendliness, inventiveness, supportiveness, and problem-solving. These charming individuals can flourish in professions that require customer interaction and relationship building. Additionally, many ESFPs enjoy outdoor work. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Front-desk hotel receptionist
  • Customer service representative
  • Brand manager
  • Waiter
  • Restaurant cook
  • Secretary
  • Administrative assistant
  • Physician
  • Scientist
  • Nurse
  • Veterinarian
  • Fisherman
  • Farmer

Extroverted, sensing, thinking, and judging (ESTJ) type

A professional with an ESTJ personality is likely to be an effective team manager, a skilled planner, an analytical thinker, and a dependable decision-maker who considers long-term impacts. These professionals may enjoy interacting with others and achieving corporate goals. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Chief sustainability officer
  • Top executive
  • Financial counselor
  • Judge
  • Electrical engineer
  • Electrician
  • Civil engineer
  • Construction supervisor
  • Manager
  • Supervisor

Extroverted, sensing, feeling, and judging (ESFJ) type

For an individual with an ESFJ personality, personality-based strengths include the ability to form strong professional and personal relationships, the skill to make fact-based decisions, the aptitude to nurture others, and the ability to pursue goals. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Teacher
  • Professor
  • Nanny
  • Registered nurse
  • Nursing assistant
  • Dental assistant
  • Dentist
  • Medical record technician
  • Database manager
  • Hairdresser
  • Cosmetologist
  • Dermatologist
  • Landscape gardener
  • Manicurist
  • Career counselor

Learn more: The Work Environment: Definition, Key Features, and Types

Extroverted, intuitive, thinking, and judging (ENTJ) type

An individual with an ENTJ personality is likely to be skilled in leading a large team of workers, understanding the interests and goals of others, problem-solving, and working toward long-term goals. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Manager
  • Supervisor
  • Mechanical engineer
  • Industrial engineer
  • Creative director
  • Urban regional planner
  • Management consultant

Extroverted, intuitive, feeling, and judging (ENFJ) type

A person with an ENFJ personality is likely to have strengths in the areas of team building, negotiating, empathizing, and being goal oriented. A worker with these traits is usually effective in both leader or follower positions. These professionals tend to be effective communicators. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Public relations specialist
  • Career counselor
  • Teacher
  • Fundraising manager
  • Occupational therapist
  • Psychologist
  • Meeting planner
  • Broadcast technician
  • Artist
  • Interior designer

Extroverted, intuitive, thinking, and perceiving (ENTP) type

A professional whose personality type is ENTP will probably have strengths in areas such as collaborating with a team, being visionary, being analytical, and finding solutions quickly. Inspired workers in this personality cluster seem in-tune with industry tends and competitor motivations, so they can be valuable assets in many occupations. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Human resources manager
  • Sales manager
  • Creative director
  • Landscape architect
  • Advertising sales agent
  • Food scientist
  • UX designer

Extroverted, intuitive, feeling, and perceiving (ENFP) type

With an ENFP personality, a professional is likely to have the ability to work well with team members, inspire and nurture others, and find solutions others cannot see. Suitable careers for this type include:

  • Psychologist
  • Bartender
  • Forester
  • Fitness trainer
  • Artist
  • Actor
  • Singer
  • Dancer
  • Choreographer
  • Composer
  • Musician
  • Director

Taking the MBTI test enables you to focus on a cluster of personality traits and associated professions. While this can guide you toward suitable careers for your Myers-Briggs type, you may have preferences, values, and achievements that have adapted you for an occupation that is not typically associated with your personality. Consequently, use what you have learned in this article as a starting point during the career search. You’re a unique individual, and only you can decide on the profession that best suits you. Discover companies hiring by location, job title, and industry.

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