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Are You Being Paid Fairly? Glassdoor Global Survey Reveals Salary Transparency Perceptions

Today is Equal Pay Day, a day to raise awareness around the gender pay gap and find solutions to reach pay equity. To help, Glassdoor today is hosting a roundtable discussion on pay equality featuring Hillary Clinton, among other leaders, and revealing results of our Global Salary Transparency Survey*.

We know the gender pay gap is real and significant, according to recent Glassdoor research, yet talking about pay and salaries remains one of the most prominent taboos in today’s workplace. While some employers are taking strides to address salary transparency, a new Glassdoor survey finds that nearly 7 in 10 employees globally wish they had a better understanding of what fair pay is for their position and skill set at their company and in their local market.

This survey also uncovers how employees really feel about what they need to do to get a pay raise, whether their employer discloses salaries internally, whether they have a good understanding of how pay is determined at their company, along with other insights into salary and pay topics.

Most Employees Feel They Must Jump Ship to Earn a Higher Salary

The grass always seems to look a little greener elsewhere and apparently so do the prospects for a pay raise. Conducted in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, The Netherlands and Switzerland, the survey finds more than half (56%) of employed adults in these countries believe they must switch companies in order to obtain any meaningful change in compensation. However in the U.S., Canada, U.K., France and Germany, employees under the age of 55 are more likely to feel the need to change companies for a raise than those ages 55+.

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Most Employees Report Their Company Does Not Share Salaries Internally

Sharing salary information among employees at a company is still not considered common practice, and the survey finds only about one-third (36%) of employees globally say their company does share information internally about how much money employees earn. Americans (31%) are least likely to say their employer shares salary details internally, whereas Dutch employees (50%) are most likely to say they have salary insights.

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Men Claim More Clarity Around How Pay is Determined Than Women

Globally, employed men (59%) are more likely than their female counterparts (51%) to believe they have a good understanding of how people are compensated at all levels in their company. This data point raises questions related to whether men have access to more salary data than women, if they perceive to have more knowledge about salaries (vs. actually having pay insights), or if they are asking more direct questions of leadership regarding pay levels.

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Is Salary Transparency Good for Employee Satisfaction? Good for Overall Business?

Also of note, the survey asked employees whether they believe talking about pay is good for employee satisfaction and business. The majority says ‘yes’ to both. Seven in 10 (70%) believe salary transparency is good for employee satisfaction and more than 7 in 10 (72%) believe it’s good for business, too.

Check out the complete results of the Glassdoor Global Salary Transparency Survey and detailed employee perceptions by country.

VIDEO: Watch real employees share their salaries in Glassdoor’s #ShareYourPay video!

PAY EQUALITY ROUNDTABLE: Watch what Hillary Clinton, Glassdoor CEO Robert Hohman and Olympic Gold Medalist & World Cup Champion Megan Rapinoe, among other leaders, have to say about pay equality topics, including potential solutions to reach pay equity.

Want to increase salary transparency at your company? Share your salary anonymously on Glassdoor.

*Methodology

This survey was conducted online within Canada, Switzerland, Germany, France, Netherlands, United Kingdom and the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Glassdoor from October 1-5, 2015 among 8,254 adults ages 18 and older, among which 2,049 are in the U.S., 1,057 are in the UK, 1,019 are in The Netherlands, 1,029 are in France, 1,029 are in Germany, 1,018 are in Switzerland, and 1,053 are in Canada. Furthermore, among all countries, 4,300 are employed full-time/part-time, 930 are employees in the U.S., 531 are employees in the UK, 486 are employees in The Netherlands, 605 are employees in France, 630 are employees in Germany, 628 are employees in Switzerland, and 490 are employees in Canada. All responses noted are from adults who are employed part time / full time. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.