Career Advice, Jobs

One Thing You Can Do To Improve Your Professional Karma

As the year winds down, many of us are taking a look back at our 2016 accomplishments. And in many cases, we look back over the weeks and months only to think, “Darn, is that all I did?” Somewhere between binging Netflix, competing for a promotion and those late nights at the office, the year has whizzed by.

We know the feeling.

Sure, you’ve made money and survived another year in the work world, but have you ever thought about your professional karma.

Karma, in Hinduism and Buddhism, is the sum of a person’s actions in this and previous states of existence, and it decides your fate in future existences. In layman’s terms, the law of karma basically states that every action has a reaction and whatever you do to others will later return. As 2016 wraps up, it’s time to think about boosting your professional karma. And if you’re thinking about changing jobs, you’re in luck. Here’s the one thing you can to to ensure you’re not reborn as the office equivalent of a cockroach:

As 2016 wraps up, it’s time to think about boosting your professional karma. And if you’re thinking about changing jobs, you’re in luck. Here’s the one thing you can to to ensure you’re not reborn as the office equivalent of a cockroach:

Start working at a nonprofit.

Taking your skills, no matter what they are, to a nonprofit is the quintessential way to give back to others and cement your reputation as a “good guy.” While it may not make up for that one time you had to lay-off employees for budget reasons or absolve you of drinking too much at last year’s holiday party, it will bring tremendous rewards to your life—and the lives of others.

[Related: Search Open Jobs In Your Area Hiring Now!]

Glassdoor turned to Idealist.org to find out how working in the nonprofit sector can be a great move for you professional and personally. In a nutshell: giving back doesn’t mean giving up on the career (or paycheck) of your dreams.

Here’s why you should consider working for a nonprofit:

1. Gain unique skills.
“Working in the nonprofit sector sometimes is considered taking a break from the “real world,” with the implied assumption that it is not an option to spend a lifetime doing this work. In reality, the nonprofit sector provides many people with a lifetime of exciting work. Nonprofits also tend to offer young people more leadership opportunities than other sectors.”

[Related: Boost Your Career By Giving Back]

2. Compete in a different way, professionally.
“In a world of limited resources, nonprofit organizations compete intensely for media attention, recognition, funding and other resources. In some cases, competition among organizations with similar missions may be detrimental to the pursuit of this shared mission, but competition also can be healthy, and a catalyst to adopt more effective programs. Organizations collaborate often and talk about working together even more. But some organizations provide a similar service and compete to be the most effective provider of that service. In other situations, organizations work on different solutions to a similar problem. On certain issues, organizations may have missions that are in direct opposition to one another (abortion, environmental reform, gun control, etc.).”

3. It’s not just about shelters and soup kitchens.
“The most visible nonprofits are often soup kitchens, mentoring programs, and other organizations that involve people working directly with other people who need some form of assistance. But many people who work for nonprofits are accountants, computer programmers, sales people, human resources professionals, managers, fundraisers, and executives. Many more are researchers and advocates for certain issues or supporting the work of direct service organizations.

[Related: Glassdoor Donates Product to Nonprofits, Further Delivering on Pledge 1% Commitment]

4. You don’t have to necessarily take a pay cut.
“Most nonprofits rely on paid staff in addition to volunteers. The term “nonprofit” does not mean that nonprofit professionals do not earn a salary. “Nonprofit” refers to the 501(c) tax code in the United States. Non-governmental organization, or NGO, and “charity” are the common terms used outside the US. Revenues generated by nonprofit organizations go back into programs that serve the organizations’ mission. There are no stockholders receiving annual financial dividends, and employees do not receive a bonus at the end of a good year. According to Independent Sector, $670 billion are earned by nonprofit organizations annually, and one in twelve Americans work in the nonprofit sector.”

 

DISCOVER: Read Employees’ Reviews of Nonprofits