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Interviews

3 Questions to Ask After an Interview

Posted by Heather Huhman

October 19, 2018

The big interview you’ve spent weeks preparing for is finally over. What do you do now?

Persistence is key to any job search, which is why job seekers are encouraged to follow up with hiring managers after an interview.

There are a variety of ways to follow up with hiring managers. Most job seekers choose to send a handwritten thank-you note or a thoughtful message via email. When following up with a hiring manager, it’s a good idea to include a question. This shows the hiring manager you’re purposeful with your email and want to build a relationship.

But it’s best not to follow up with questions such as “Did I get the job?” or “When will you make a decision?” These questions often come off as pesky or annoying if the hiring manager already told you when they’d be in touch.

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The next time you’re ready to follow up with a hiring manager after a job interview, here are three types of questions to ask:

1. Ask About Logistics of the Position

During interviews, it can be easy to forget or feel nervous about asking a question regarding the position. If there was a topic you wish you had more clarification on, feel free to ask for more details in your follow up email.

For example, if the hiring manager mentioned travel would be part of the job, but didn’t elaborate on the topic, ask for more information in your follow up email.

“During the interview, you mentioned the position requires the employee to travel once a month. Can you explain more what this travel consists of?”

2. Ask About the Company

If you’re looking for a unique way to stand out to hiring managers when following up, engage them in a conversation relevant to the position you applied for.

For example, if the hiring manager mentioned a new project the company is working on, follow up with an article or question regarding that project.

“Did you read this XYZ article on Mashable last week? I thought this topic was very relevant to the project you mentioned during the interview. What do you think?”

3. Ask About the Hiring Process

During some interviews, hiring managers forget to mention when they’ll be in touch after the applications have been reviewed. If it’s been seven to 10 days since the job interview and you haven’t received a response, ask a question regarding the hiring process in your follow up email.

"Hello Dan. I wanted to follow up with you about the Marketing Director position. I was wondering if you could provide a timeline of the hiring process.”

Following up after a job interview is essential if you want to be at the forefront of a hiring manager’s mind. The best way to keep your application at the top of the pile is to follow up with engaging and meaningful questions showing your interest in the position.

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