Cyberactive Reviews | Glassdoor

Cyberactive Reviews

4 reviews

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2.2
Star Star Star Star Star
Recommend to a friend
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Sharon Naim
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Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (2)

    "Sales and Marketing"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Cyberactive full-time

    Pros

    Flexible, nice people, nice location

    Cons

    Disconnect between managers and departments, low pay and no benefits

    Advice to Management

    Invest more into your employees


  2. Helpful (2)

    "One of the worst companies you can work for"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Web Developer in Beverly Hills, CA
    Former Employee - Web Developer in Beverly Hills, CA
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Cyberactive full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Location. The location is at the center of Beverly Hills which gives you plenty of choices to eat around during lunch.

    Cons

    There is no formal training when you start. You start working not knowing what you have to do, you learn on the job.

    There are plenty of snakes in the company. There is definitely favoritism and everyone is willing to rat out a co-worker in order to keep their job. It does not matter how long you have been there or how hard you worked at this job, you will be fired sooner or later.

    There is no hierarchy of order. Micromanagement does not help at all. Everyone is confused about what they are supposed to do.

    There is no benefits at all even for a full-time position. Cheap company. Look elsewhere.

    No respect for employees whatsoever. You are treated as dispensable just like everyone else.

    You are expected to work the best you can for very little to no recognition.

    You will be asked to do things beyond your job description most of the time.

    You will not be compensated well and the stress will be too overwhelming.

    Advice to Management

    Do not just hire anyone who can work 40 hours a week. Honesty is the best policy and protect your employees from mistreatment. Provide training to newcomers, do not just make them start working on a previous employee's unfinished projects.


  3. Helpful (8)

    "A Disorganized Company with a Sub-Par Working Environment"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Santa Monica, CA
    Former Employee - Project Manager in Santa Monica, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Cyberactive full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - The company offers some flexible hours and, depending on your position, some personal/holiday days.

    - Most of the employees who work there are extremely nice and willing to help in whatever way possible. It's a good family vibe.

    - New ideas are often welcome if you can provide good support for why they should be implemented.

    Cons

    - The other management is not on top of the work processes. The project leads have no project management ability of note, and very limited understanding of the scope for any of the web-based projects that are requested.

    - They're not competitive with their pay. If you find a job ad from them listing a certain salary "Depending on Experience", be prepared to get 10-15k less than that after they offer you the position regardless of how impressive your resume is. Once you start working there, you'll have to spend the first year or two working to reach the salary that was initially listed on the ad.

    - Because of the company's lack of understanding of how to pay competitively in a web development/technology field in Los Angeles, you will always be working with sub-par developers and creative teams who are contracted overseas.

    - There is no medical/dental, no 401k, and you will have to work 45 hours per week to receive your full salary. If you want to work a standard 40-hour work week, your pay will be cut.

    - There is no formal QA process, and the management constantly has to be reminded what step of the development process comes next (Example: website creative comps will be sent off to HTML without being approved, business requirements and use-case documents won't even be reviewed before development occurs).

    - Everything is heavily monitored. Every keystroke of your keyboard is recorded. All of your phone calls are recorded. You are videotaped 24/7. Your 30-minute lunch break is very closely monitored through clocking in and out with a thumbprint scan.

    - Communication is lacking. No one ever has any idea what anyone else is doing. There are no regular status meetings and no hot sheets or project lists. Most employees have no experience in a web-development field or with anything technology-related and just follow what they're told to do.

    - No formal training is ever provided. You will be given work that is not in your initial job description and not within your work experience, and you will be expected to learn it on your own. This is not necessarily because they don't want to take the time to train you. It's because no one who works there will have the right knowledge to train you properly. You will not get paid extra for this work, even if you ask.

    Advice to Management

    1. Pay competitively and offer medical/dental and paid time off after a certain length of employment. You aren't doing anything to encourage employee loyalty, and you have a revolving door business model to show for it.

    A project manager who oversees QA, development, copywriting, and project creation should be making at least $40k. With a couple years experience, you should be paying them $50k. The people you snare for $16/hr. aren't experienced enough to know better, and you shouldn't be hiring them.

    2. Screen your employees more effectively. Get someone with a good amount of business management skills in the digital field to oversee all of the projects full time.

    3. Learn more about digital development processes so you have a better understanding of how quality digital products are created.

    4. The owner/president/CEO of a company shouldn't be micromanaging everything. It's inefficient.

    5. You desperately need a dedicated QA person/s. You should NOT be using customers as your quality control. Help tickets should be supplementary - not your entire QA process.


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  5. "All the support, None of the B.S."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Writer in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Writer in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends

    Pros

    Worked here for nearly a year. Never once had a problem. Got work from remote boss, but had his boss in my office. Both were great to work with, gave great advice on projects, never took their own problems out on employees like most managers I've worked under. I simply got the work, always had someone patient to turn to with questions, and got plenty of positive reinforcement when things went well.

    Cons

    Work was a little boring at times.

    Advice to Management

    Keep up what you're doing.