MapQuest Interview Questions | Glassdoor

MapQuest Interview Questions

Interviews at MapQuest

18 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Associate Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Lancaster, PA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at MapQuest (Lancaster, PA) in October 2012.

    Interview

    This position was for an entry level position. The interview in total was approximately 3 hours. It was split into 3 smaller interviews. The first was with the team I would be joining if I get the position. The second was with 2 System Architects, and the third interview was with the hiring manager. The first 2 interviews I was asked to write some code. The third interview I was asked to write a sql join statement. In all it was a very laid back interview. One of the interviews went short so I played ping pong with one of the interviewees.

    Interview Questions

    Negotiation

    There was no negotiations, the salary offered was more than expected.


  2.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a week. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in May 2014.

    Interview

    The interview process started with a phone call from an employee presumably to look for interest, and then a call from the hiring manager. We discussed what technology stacks MapQuest uses (Scala, Java, Ruby on Rails, ObjectiveC) and current projects. There were questions about my skills and interests.

    Next, there was a online code exercise about converting a string to morse code.

    A few days later, there was an onsite, half day interview. The meeting was with individual engineers, and one time with a pair of engineers. It included the option to sit at a pairing station to look at a problem in a current project, or to draw up examples on the whiteboard for exercises like 'How would you approach designing software to manage a vending machine?'.

    Next, the interviewer pulled up on a screen some examples of my contib code on github. We walked through and discussed some of the work.

    There were standard questions about background, experience, and motivation by the managers. They discussed strengths like culture, and process at MapQuest.

    Interview Questions

    • What is the most recent programming concept you researched? Why, and how did you go about it?   Answer Question
  3.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 1+ week. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in September 2016.

    Interview

    Talked with a recruiter. Then I was given a code test that was pretty straight forward. Then an in house interview. Overall the process from beginning to end took about a week and a half.

    Interview Questions

    • Explain oop concepts and design patterns. What testing frameworks have you used? How do you know when you're done testing?   Answer Question

  4.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a week. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in November 2016.

    Interview

    I was contacted via a recruiter with an opportunity to interview for MapQuest in their Denver office. I had no phone screen just brought in directly for an on-site. The office was an open layout and had the "start-up" feel. I had two sets of whiteboarding questions from two pairs of potential teammates. Each session lasted around 45 minutes. The first round I was asked a simple programming question. However, one of the interviewers was totally unprepared and he admitted it. I got the feeling neither had actually looked at my resume before even stepping in the room. This is very unprofessional and a red flag. The second set of interviews gave me another programming question to whiteboard. The dev asking the question had difficult describing the question. He told me, "Man, it's been a long time since I asked this question". After about 10 mins of trying to explain the question, I was writing my solution on the board and asking questions about the intended solution. He was very unclear in answering my questions still, as if he didn't know the exact question himself. After finishing what I could only guess was the solution due to lack of information from the interviewer, the two interviewers, one that was leading and asking the question and the other who sat quietly the whole time, began to argue if my solution was correct in front of me. Again, very unprofessional to not be prepared for the interview and argue in front of the interviewee. Lastly, I met with the hiring manager. He had only been at the company a few weeks. We had a good discussion and he was a very likable. However, he asked me how I felt the interview went, were the questions too easy, too hard, etc. I didn't have the heart to tell him his team needs training on how to interview. Bottom line: They are unprepared, unprofessional, lack coordination and pull from a set bag of interview questions.

    Interview Questions

    • Write a program/function to give the change in the least number of coins for an amount under a dollar.

      example:
      input: $0.76
      output: 3 quarters, 1 penny   Answer Question

  5.  

    Marketing Manager Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO).

    Interview

    Phone screen, phone interview with hiring manager then 4-5 hour interview onsite with various people. Overall the process was pretty standard. Everyone was super nice and helpful in answering questions. Your interview questions will vary but be prepared to answer a lot of cultural fit questions as you will meet with a Cultural Ambassador who will sign off on fit.

    Interview Questions


  6.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in May 2017.

    Interview

    Initial Phone screen with Recruiter.
    - General questions about experience and language, tools that I have worked on. During this phone screen, the recruiter asked what is your salary expection? Told her, this is what I will be targeting, She literally said "isn't that bit much". She had a non american accent. I was like that is what other companies are willing to offer.

    Then there was phone screen with manager and another engineer in the team. This was normal, talked about experience and bunch of technical questions around my responses.
    Phone screen went well, they scheduled me for 3 hr In person at the Downtown office

    The office is located right off of 16th street mall which is not too bad. The personal interviews started with the teams withe members of the team taking rounds to interview me.
    Most of the tech questions were around white boarding what I have worked on previously, find solutions to the problems they present and explain why you would take that approach.

    After the 3 hr interview, they invited me for another round of 1.5 hrs in-person but I declined it. here is my thought, if you are willing to work at a chaotic company where employees have no place for table to work. Do apply and go for it. The employees are sitting wall to wall(inch -inch).

    It was not bad overall. But one to many rounds of interviews

    Interview Questions

    • Write a diagram of a model, architecture of the Stack you working on?
      here is the problem, give me solutions how to approach and why.
      All White boarding of course   1 Answer

  7.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in January 2012.

    Interview

    I was referred by a friend in December and got interviewed in January. First, I came to the office for a preliminary interview with a manager and then had a series of 3 interviews with other software engineers. After that, there was a coding exercise which was rather poorly specified: I was supposed to submit some code whether it compiled or even did anything. I sent in part of a game I was working on, and was asked to submit another sample when the team felt my game didn't display much (it didn't have any web component, for instance).

    Interview Questions

    • Explain the reasoning behind the OO practice of favoring composition over inheritance. When would you use one or the other?   1 Answer

    Negotiation

    I didn't negotiate - the salary was what I expected.

  8.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 days. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in March 2015.

    Interview

    As a previous interviewer and the now being an active contractor, I will say the process is very fair for both parties. An interview should give both parties the opportunity to make a good decision on whether to pursue an opportunity and I believe MapQuest did a really good job of that.

    Most interviews for developer positions will include some form of code test. The at home code test was excellent in showing general development knowledge and problem solving skills without being lame and asking ridiculously impossible or tedious questions.

    The in person interview was also very timely and fair. I was able to easily display my skill set and leave them with the knowledge they needed to choose to hire me or not. I also was given the opportunity to ask employees of different skillsets and roles various questions that I found to be important.

    Lastly because i was able to meet with several members of the team, I was able to get a good sense of the culture. I'm a big culture person so it was important for me to know what i was looking at.

    I found the process to be fair and timely, I only spend about 2 hours and they got back to me literally that day. That mean i went really through the entire process in 2 days! I don't know what more you would want from an interview process. I will definitely take some notes and reuse some stuff from it.

    I also want to take a shot at the Mac shop comment someone else posted, that's just ridiculous.

    Interview Questions

    • Diagram a classic example of a factory and inheritance. Diagram an example of a factory and inheritance in Javascript. Explain the differences.   1 Answer

  9. Helpful (1)  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at MapQuest.

    Interview

    Denver's hottest downtown workplace ... is MapQuest.

    After being enticed into applying several times and taking an on-line coding tests, I finally went in for a interview. This time it was a short phone screen, then an interview in the office.

    This Google wanna-be has everything. Free snacks, toys, props, yoga, kamikazes, a massage chair, polished concrete floors, vitamin water, that snooty apple-user vibe, and half of an old boat at the front door.

    The office theme is either Gilligan's Island or an ill-fated spin-off of The Internship. They say to dress comfortably because everyday is Friday at MQ. Business casual is over-dressed when your would-be female manager dresses for an interview in a cut-off Belichick hoodie. What a way to represent your company to potential employees.

    If you want to dress for work like you're a poor college student or share mice with the guy who bikes 10-km to work - this place is for you! Did I mention the free snacks? They are very proud of that for some reason.

    The interview was more are you cool and nerdy enough to be in our club than skills assessment. Do you do it like we do, because we do it right. And, everything works better on a MacBook - everyone just knows that, right? Do you regularly attend user groups?

    Overall - disappointing, pretentious, and unprofessional.

    Interview Questions

    • Do you attend user groups? (Asked twice.)   Answer Question
    • I found this puzzle on the internet last night and solved it with my wife, you solve it now.   Answer Question
    • What is the syntax of a for loop? (Yes, really.)   Answer Question

  10. Helpful (5)  

    Associate Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at MapQuest (Denver, CO) in March 2013.

    Interview

    The process began shortly after I applied for the position online. Approximately 3 days after I applied, I got a phone call from their hiring manager and chief Product Manager. He seemed friendly and engaging, and asked general "Tell me about yourself" sorts of questions. He told me that Id be receiving a follow up call in the next 3 days from another team member. It was only a few hours later that I got a call from another Product Management supervisor in PA. He complimented my resume, and even said that he was sending it to their tallent acquisition department because it was one of the best he had seen. He asked about my time frame and explained that I'd be receiving an email to schedule an onsite interview. Both of these calls lasted only 30 minutes a piece.
    About three days later I received an email from AOLs scheduling team that told me exactly when my interview would be. They are very organized in their approach to setting up interviews. A week later (after traveling for many hours to get there) I interviewed on site. The Denver headquarters is incredible, and it is clear that they try to maintain a catchy office space for recruitment purposes. I am not sure employees get much time to enjoy it. The interview consisted of four 30 min conversations with people in denver, as well as people in PA via teleconference. The video system was not working properly when I arrived, and they spent about twenty minutes working on it. They have you speak with a Cultural Advisor for 45 minutes. The Cultural Advisor asks questions from a list provided to them by AOL. I think they give you a grade based upon your answers. Make sure you speak slowly as the Cultural Advisor takes notes, and I caught my guy paraphrasing my answers into points i did not intend to make. Just study up and you'll be fine.
    Unfortunately the bad points of the hiring process out-way the good. During my interview I spoke with a Project Manager via teleconference in PA. Right from the get go he came across as agressive and irritated by the process. He asked loaded questions like "Tell me a joke," and "I'll be your boss. How do you feel about that?" I have some work experience at non-profits on my resume. Serving a greater good is something I care about. When he looked at my resume and saw these listings, he asked "What is this, a throw away job?" I find this incredibly rude and uncalled for as AOL puts so much emphasis on its employees values and ethics. This is clearly one of those interviewers that likes to feel dominant to the interviewee.
    Following the interview, I sent a brief thank you to each of the interviewers. None of them replied. After a week, I sent a brief follow up to the hiring manager to express my continued interest. He never replied. Another week went by, and I sent a second follow up to him hoping to get an idea for where I stood. Again, no reply. After a third week went by I sent yet another very cordial follow up, still no reply. By this time I figured I had fallen off their radar all together. After a fourth week I sent an email to the AOL rep that had originally scheduled my interview in Denver, to confirm that I had the hiring manager's correct contact info. She confirmed that I did. MapQuest's hiring manager was simply ignoring me. No "Sorry, we're going in a different direction" nothing.
    Such levels of unprofessionalism and discourtesy surprise me. In a time in which MapQuest's competitors are stronger than ever, I am surprised at how they seem so eager to take their biggest fans (the consumers who want to work for them) for granted. It seems AOL and MapQuest have lost at least one more advocate.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me a Joke.   1 Answer
    • Most of the questions were circumstantial and went like: How would you collect information on a POI (Point of Interest) if it were say: a theme park.   1 Answer
    • The first few months your here you will have to just sit at a desk and write about our 100 most popular POIs. How do you feel about doing this?
      His tone made it sound like it would be busy "lackluster" work. He wanted to see if I would be ok with the boring parts of the job.   1 Answer

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