DraftKings Interview Questions | Glassdoor

DraftKings Interview Questions

Updated Oct 14, 2018
144 Interview Reviews

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  1. Helpful (9)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2+ weeks. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in March 2014.

    Interview

    First step was an in-depth recruiter phone screen, then I was immediately scheduled for a manager phone screen, then called back for the 1 onsite interview when I met multiple managers.
    Within hours the company recruiter was back in touch with me getting feedback and asking my interest level.

    Interview Questions

    • Walk me through a difficult decision you had to make recently, explain your reasoning, and why this was difficult for you? What would have happened if you had decided differently?   1 Answer

    Negotiation

    I worked directly with the recruiter who was direct and honest. She gave me choices and asked my preferences in regards to what parts of the offer were important to me. She made it easy for me to get the right offer for me in this situation. It was a frank and easy discussion because expectations were set earlier when we spoke initially. I signed up with DraftKings for the long haul, to work here for many years, and I believe I am set up for a great future here.


  2. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 5 days. I interviewed at DraftKings in September 2015.

    Interview

    I was called for a technical phone interview in which I was asked to write code for a question comparing a few user's total scores and then give each user a competitive rank. The interviewer asked me to talk through the code as I wrote it. Part of the question involved sorting and I very honestly told him I didn't remember much about the built-in Java sort. He posted a link to documentation for it which led to me asking if I was allowed to look up documentation online during the interview. He acted as if I should have known that from the beginning despite not ever telling me. It took me about 20 minutes or so to write out a solution and then he began to ask me questions about it. At one point he asked me about a function I wrote to compare elements in a list pointing out that return type should be different than the one I had. Despite me explaining that the return type I had was correct, which it was, he argued with me until I changed it to the type that he wanted. At the end of the first question, he asked me if I could improve the solution I had. I explained the best way of doing it that I realized after I finished my first solution. His response to this was telling me, "Yeah that's how I would have done it the first time around," in a very rude and matter-of-fact kind of tone. Finally he asked me another quick question which involved finding the intersection of two rosters of players. I was just asked to talk through this question and ended up coming up with solution very quickly. I asked him what the next steps were in the interview process and he said they would get back to me within the next two days. They emailed me back 4 hours later rejecting me with no explanation.

    Interview Questions

    • Rank players based on total score in the case that some players tied in score and find the intersection of two rosters.   1 Answer
  3. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Amherst, MA
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. I interviewed at DraftKings (Amherst, MA) in October 2014.

    Interview

    I went with the career services at UMass Amherst and interviewed in a cubicle. The interview questions were pretty basic algorithmically but required you to understand the domain of the problem and how complicated things can get. About 45 mins interview, and coded on paper. They are probably going to change this process as they grow but it was very relaxed and fun.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you return a set of players that represents the union of two rosters?   1 Answer

  4. Helpful (6)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 days. I interviewed at DraftKings in September 2015.

    Interview

    Process was very fast, applied online, spoke to the recruiter and had technical phone interview within 24 hours. A half day on-site two days later. My schedule was really busy at my current job and they were flexible to let me start later in the afternoon. Interview was a programming exercise and design exercise. The recruiter came in to tell me that I was cut after the design exercise. He was very empathetic and gave feedback that made sense. The two engineering interviewers were very nice and easy to talk to. I think that I have the stuff for the job but work a little slower than they want. All in all it was a good experience and I'm sure the hire great engineers.

    Interview Questions


  5. Helpful (8)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 5 days. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in September 2015.

    Interview

    After receiving many LinkedIn messages from DraftKings over the last several months, I finally decided to give it a chance and interview. I was skeptical of the business model, which is basically just gambling, but certainly interested in fantasy sports.

    Phone screen was remarkably easy. Two questions around ranking a set of scores and comparing two fantasy rosters. I was allowed to use .NET libraries, so I didn't really have to even implement the sort or compare.

    In person, they took me to a small room with two chairs, a small table, and a whiteboard. First interviewer brought in a laptop with Visual Studio and said I had 45 minutes to implement a fantasy football lineup validator with a given set of rules. I was not given a mouse, so I had to use the horrible Lenovo touchpad. He said he would come back every 15 minutes to check my progress, but he forgot to do this. Fortunately the program was pretty simple and I managed to finish it in time thanks to my experience with keyboard shortcuts in Visual Studio. (If I had not been a VS expert, with no mouse, this would have basically been impossible to finish in 45 minutes. Not to mention how confusing it would have been if I had been unfamiliar with fantasy football.)

    Second interviewer came in carrying the board game Battleship. He said it was an object-oriented design question, and asked me to design a program to play Battleship. I asked him if he wanted me to just talk through it or write on the board, and he said whatever I was more comfortable with. So I started to draw a simple picture and started to describe the data structures I would need. Battleship is a quite simple game, so I was done with this in around 10 minutes. At this point the tiny whiteboard was mostly full, and there was no eraser in the room - so I was basically done writing, though I tried to write over some stuff at some points. The next 30 minutes were incredibly awkward. The interviewer asked me a bunch of detailed questions about how the objects would interact, and suggested that I describe how a C# console application might use these objects. I talked through that. Whatever I was saying was clearly not what he was looking for - I have no idea what he was looking for. I started talking about performance optimizations and possible feature enhancements, but didn't get much of a response. After 45 minutes (of what was supposed to be a 60 minute interview, I think), he said he had no more questions and left. The only thing I can think is that he actually wanted me to write the code for the program - which I never did, of course, because he said it was a design question and never asked me to code (and the eraser-less whiteboard was full, anyway).

    Less than a minute later, the recruiter comes in and abruptly ends the interview. Tells me the design interview went badly and suggests maybe it's because I don't design programs every day. (Which I do, by the way.) Then he walks me out of the office and points me to the elevator.

    I am a highly experienced software interviewer - on both sides of the table, interviewer and interviewee, with several top tech companies - and have never seen such a poor process or poor candidate experience. I wasn't sure I was interested in working at DraftKings coming in, and now I just feel bad for everyone whose time they are wasting in the interview process. I guess this is what happens when you get $300M in funding and just have to interview and hire at warp speed - quality gets lost in the process.

    Interview Questions

    • Create an object-oriented design for a program that plays Battleship.   Answer Question

  6. Helpful (7)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 1+ week. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in August 2015.

    Interview

    The entire interview process was a mess and totally disorganized. The phone interview was relatively straightforward, I was asked to rank a list of players based on their total score. Each player was a class object.

    Onsite, the first interview was a coding question to determine if a football lineup is valid, based on 5 rules that they give you. However, unless you are familiar with fantasy football, the question requires a lot of clarification. Worst part is, they give you only 1 hour, including the clarifications. So, if you don't understand what certain terms mean and ask the interviewer to explain, you are losing a lot of time. If you don't complete this section, you're basically out.

    After this section, I spoke with a recruiter and told him I'm more interested in a specific team, and had already mentioned this earlier. For the next 2 hours, I sat in that room all alone, while the recruiter went searching for an interviewer! Finally he found somebody and that person asked me questions that had absolutely nothing to do with software engineering whatsoever. In all, a horrible experience and a complete waste of time.

    Lastly, they fumble around the expense reimbursement process, and don't pay the entire amount that you claim (with receipts of course). They don't have an official travel policy, so it's very hard to figure out what they didn't pay for.

    tdl;dr - Avoid this company like the plague!

    Interview Questions

    • 1. Given a list of players, rank them in descending order of their total points. Points are also given.
      2. Given a lineup of players, find if the lineup is valid. Five rules are given.   Answer Question

  7. Helpful (11)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a week. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in September 2015.

    Interview

    Beginning to end took exactly 1 week. I was contacted by a corporate recruiter who keyed in on my LinkedIn. I wasn't looking but having heard a lot about DraftKings I was curious. I talked to the recruiter which led to a phone interview. Phone interview was coding exercise that led to an inperson interview. Inperson interview was with the recruiter and three engineers who I think were engineering managers for a coding, design and general interview. I also met with a director of engineering briefly. The interview was difficult but non-trivial. The recruiter wrapped up with me and told me that they decided not to go further. He explained feedback which I appreciated. I definitely wanted to work there. Everyone was nice. I can learn there. The company is really exciting. You have to have full lifecycle experience to do well on their interview.

    Interview Questions

    • Describe the architecture of the your most recent project.   Answer Question
  8. Helpful (11)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took a week. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in July 2015.

    Interview

    I found the company through a current employee, who was quite friendly and referred me for a position. What followed proved to be one of the strangest processes I have experienced.

    I first spoke with a recruiter, who was excited and engaging. Given my background and performance during the interview, he recommended I skip the formality of the tech screen and drop by for the onsite round. I soon connected with someone to coordinate my visit. Later that afternoon, however, the recruiter called me back to explain that the lead recruiter had overridden his decision and had insisted I go through the tech screen. He sounded defeated, as though he had been reprimanded. I felt bad for him—calling me back must have been humiliating.

    I passed the tech screen, and the next week I came in for the onsite interview. The schedule included a coding challenge and a design project mixed with some behavioral elements. The first interviewer seemed friendly and set me up with the coding test, which involved validating a user’s roster given certain rules. While conceptually simple the setup featured a fantasy-sports system with multiple objects for players and positions, which I found rather confusing. In retrospect I would probably design it in a similar fashion, but deciphering foreign code and design in a timed, high-pressure environment convoluted my answer. I completed five of six requirements and given five more minutes would have finished the sixth. It was not my best work, but it was certainly fine. I discussed my answer with my interviewer, who agreed with my reasoning and said the next interviewer would be in shortly.

    After more than fifteen minutes, a man came in and introduced himself as a senior member of recruiting. He told me that they had decided not to move forward with the process and immediately asked, “Are you shocked?” He said this with a strange tone, almost as though he were antagonizing me. I responded that while not shocked I was certainly surprised. He went on to explain that he prides himself on being direct with candidates and telling them exactly what he thinks. Given the current team, he felt the company needed more senior engineers and lacked the resources to bring on another junior employee. While this makes sense, his speech contained an element of self-praise, almost as though he were congratulating himself for his own prowess. He continued, claiming that my performance on the test—quite good but not exactly what they wanted—reflected my entire skillset, background, and potential as an engineer. This served as the foundation for twenty minutes of self-congratulating condescension. When he finally asked my thoughts, I responded that while I appreciated his being forthright I found his extrapolation based on a few minutes of contrived, high-pressure testing misguided and insulting. He said he didn’t entirely disagree. At this point I knew he was trying to break me, and I didn’t bother listening to the rest of his speech.

    While I appreciate the first recruiter and the employee who referred me, this proved the most unpleasant interviewing experience I have had. I wonder if it was the same recruiting lead who made the first recruiter call me back. In any case, this experience saved me the ethical dilemma of whether I want to work for a company that lies to its customers and builds a platform for them to gamble their money away.

    Interview Questions


  9. Helpful (7)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3 days. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in July 2015.

    Interview

    Phone call. With general questions. Mentioned I had done some Android programming and all of a sudden I was interviewing for an Android Dev. position. I mentioned that my professional experience wasn't in Android development but the recruiter sent me their interview test for Android devs anyway.


  10. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Boston, MA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at DraftKings (Boston, MA) in October 2015.

    Interview

    Was barely asked any technical questions. It was mostly being told about the awesome benefits and perks and how I'll be able to put a down payment on a house next year with what they have planned. The whole process was unprofessional and the in-house recruiter should be selling used cars. We were in the salary negotiating phase when he suddenly changed his mind without telling me. I had to call him three times before getting an email to say they decided not to move forward anymore. I do believe I dodged a bullet, though, as I read all the news articles about them lately.

    Interview Questions


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