Indeed Reviews | Glassdoor

Indeed Reviews

Updated January 20, 2018
553 reviews

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3.6
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Indeed CEO Hisayuki Idekoba
Hisayuki Idekoba
327 Ratings

553 Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • Work-life balance - No one works past 6 pm (in 46 reviews)

  • Happy Hours and Free Breakfasts/some lunches (in 69 reviews)

Cons
  • micromanagement and non existent lead generation (in 19 reviews)

  • Making 60 calls a day wasn't for me but if you can do this with no problem then it is a terrific place to work (in 15 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "BI Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    great culture and good food and relaxed

    Cons

    not normalized pay, no career direction


  2. Helpful (49)

    "Fun environment, limited for women, issues in sales"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Representative
    Former Employee - Sales Representative
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Indeed full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Very nice people! They mean well and for the most part, very workable. If you are in an office there are great perks like gourmet food, lots of company fun and events, good culture. Great benefits. Bonus plans. Unlimited PTO. I enjoyed my time here and feel it was a great place to have on the resume.

    Cons

    Upward mobility for women is desperately lacking. They were just voted a great place to work for women. Why? Because of a generous maternity policy, I would assume. They didn't even mention women in their write-up about it which is exactly appropriate for the situation. The ranking is smoke and mirrors. There are no women in the C suite and the smartest VP's leave for the C suite elsewhere. There are lots of men who think they are really smart, and most of them are, but the smartest leaders are the ones who admit and act upon diverse solutions.
    There are women on the service teams and a few other departments who are promoted and very few "friends of the family" who they know they can control. Women in sales who have moved up recently had another layer placed over their head. They are now pretty much at the same level they were but with even less power because of the additional male-dominated team put above them. Talk about a rock and a hard place.

    Tech teams are untouchable even when a client has valid issues. This creates unbelievable expectations on the sales team to keep the client happy, with no power, while your quota and livelihood is tied to this insanity.

    Everything operates in a shroud of mystery. They intentionally keep departments away from each other and their favorite word to a client need is "no". Be prepared for more NO than you have ever experienced before. It took me 4 months to figure out pricing because there is no pricing. It is "what can you get out of your customers" which is why I think this shroud exists and quite frankly, working.

    Bonus plans are paid instead of commissions. In the beginning, this seems cool, until you realize that for the amount of product you are selling, it is very subpar to industry standards, you can't help but realize you are being bilked. Especially when there were bonus bumps after ample service but they seem to have been done away with that with recent management changes. Last note on bonus over the commission structures that most salespeople are accustom to. Commissions are protected by law, bonus payouts are not. This means that as soon as you sell something on commission, you are owed that commission by law. Bonus is never required to be paid out, they will use this to their advantage and not yours.

    Base Pay: good when you 1st evaluate it. Once you get in you realize they are paying less experienced, worse performers, more. My assessment is because they are male. You are "forbidden to discuss pay rates", though by law, you are allowed to and it is illegal for them to tell you that you can fire you for it. Look it up! They can be heavily fined for this practice if someone decides to go after them. Hello Lilly Ledbetter!

    Unlimited PTO: Again this looks great on the surface. Who wouldn't want that!?! It is actually a catch 22. It is very enticing until you want to use it. When I put in for less PTO than I had taken the year before unlimited PTO change, I was chastised for abusing the policy. It all comes down to your manager. Additionally, if you accrue PTO, when you leave, they have to pay that out to you. They do not with an unlimited plan.

    Goal setting: An unspoken mystery of how they produce your goal for the quarter. Supposedly with "algorithms" and other voodoo magic. The rumor is the finance team does it- like they have any clue what your clients will be up to that quarter. Then it is handed to the sale managers where they have the liberty to adjust the number to each member of their team. (I'm not sure even they know how the initial numbers are produced. ) Soooo the top performers are almost always getting exceedingly high expectations because they work themselves to death to hit them and the not so top performers barely grow their territories. At the end of the quarter, both top, and not so top, are paid almost the same bonus with a few percentage point changes to make it less obvious... It's awesome... yeah right.
    Sales industry norms are that teams hit quota 65-75% of the time. Anything more is too easy, anything less, too hard. At Indeed, if you don't hit quota 100% of the time, you risk going "on plan". Another recent development since management change this past year. They use this form of punishment arbitrarily. If they like you and you keep hitting 90-95% of your goal, your cool. No worries. If they don't like you and you hit 95-99%, you could be in trouble or made to feel unwanted. Which as salespeople know is usually the same end result. Recently, a manager really liked their employee but senior management decided it was their time to go. He intruded on the relationship until the employee had no choice but to leave. Good times!

    Work/life balance: If you let it, Indeed will work you to death. If you don't care as much and everyone really likes you, you can live it up fairly cush and just keep hanging. I worked so hard, and everyone really liked me, and I really liked them, but I just couldn't do another year of it. They pushed me until I broke, because I cared, exceeded my goals, and was the positive life of the party. Unfortunately, as soon as you start to feel less taken care of by your employer than you are taking care of them, it's hard to get back from burnt.

    Advice to Management

    Walk the walk, don't just talk the talk. You are SO good at talking. Add diversity... really! Don't fear the powerful minorities.

    Fix the sales payment plans and expectations. You are being overly greedy with no real need, you are swimming in cash. This is your chance to keep your force loyal.

    Marketing team, enough with the ego, seriously. And your "evangelists" know NOTHING of the industry and how it relates to the actual recruitment world. Only how it relates to Indeed. And believe me, that is two different things. Pretty doesn't equal wise and experienced.

    Don't be so hell-bent on adding more people just to grow headcount, remembering that what goes up must come down. Your down is coming, prepare now and protect those who protect you. 60+% year over year growth doesn't last forever.

    Diversify your portfolio. I know you are working on it but you seriously need better ideas. You have all the data in the world and do next to nothing with it.

  3. "Great Company!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - New York in New York, NY
    Former Employee - New York in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    Great company culture that cared about it's employees. Great perks (snacks, meals, ping pong, etc.). Great WFH and PTO policy. Offices had great amenities.

    Cons

    The leadership in my particular department was not strong. It was a bit of a "club" and if you were not a member, you did not stand a chance of being heard.

    Advice to Management

    For senior management, make sure you are connecting with employees that are more than one level below you. You may not be getting a true sense of the individual department/team culture.


  4. "Amazing Culture!!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    The culture at the company is amazing! Benefits for the employees include unlimited PTO, free breakfast/lunch, happy hours, company summer and holiday parties, a holiday gift (luggage!), volunteer opportunities, IRGs, and a great work-life balance. They also provide monthly communication from the executives to ensure all employees are kept up to date on initiatives and plans. The company offices are also really well done providing a best in class work space for every worker type.

    Cons

    There is some lack of accountability in engineering/product because of the philosophy to allow people to work at their own pace and be creative. Although this may be a workplace benefit for those employees, it can be a point of frustration for others who are waiting on their work to be accomplished.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to keep the culture in mind as the company continues it's tremendous growth! It really is the secret sauce.


  5. Helpful (19)

    "Something needs to change"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Engineering
    Former Employee - Engineering
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Unlimited PTO, food/drinks, health benefits

    Cons

    It is heartbreaking to think of how lost this company has become. The fast and exponential growth of this company has led it to an unfortunate place.

    The treatment towards all minorities is poor to put it as lightly as possible. Each minority within Indeed experiences varying levels of discrimination depending on their department, management chain and which minority they are. There is no action to change the systemic bias/racism that has become part of Indeed's core culture. Bringing in an Inclusion team has only led to meetings, presentations and collaboration sessions with other companies with similar programs. Indeed is all about talking the talk when it comes to "Inclusion" but it's all empty promises and more of a facade to make Indeed seem on par with other leaders in the tech field. Inclusion is a trendy thing to talk about for Indeed and makes them look good, but really it is all for appearances. When you walk in the doors you can feel the silent distain many members of the management teams have towards all minorities. Racial bias plays a huge role in hiring. Hiring managers find any way they can to avoid hiring qualified employees of color in favor of more palatable straight white men and sometimes women. Black employees who are fortunate enough to be hired are faced with steep and unreasonable expectations to reach the same professional levels as their white counterparts. Managers find excuses to keep all minorities down and in their place. Speaking out leads to nothing but slowing your own career progression. Indeed likes to tout their LGBTQ+ involvement in the community, but honestly it is just another way for positive press. Homosexuality in all it's forms is a foreign concept to most, and to some people they are seen as lesser employees because they do not fit into the acceptable family standard that managers have, based on their personal views. All of these biases play a huge role for all minorities when it comes to pay raises, promotions, or lack there of. Unfortunately, the diversity of the senior leadership team and their vision for a safe and inclusive work environment gets stonewalled in middle management, where it is unable to truly integrate into Indeed's culture. All acts of racism and bigotry are explained away in a passive aggressive way to hide the true intentions of indeeds middle managers, the ultimate loophole.

    Indeed has a problem of hanging onto senior managers who have been with the company since the early years. It leads to unqualified leaders who are immune from conforming to normal professional standards. Some of Indeed's greatest failures stem back to people put in management positions that are highly unprepared/unqualified and lack the skills and tools to succeed at simple aspects of their jobs. These tenured employees/managers are untouchable and are able to behave and act unilaterally without consequence. It is very much the "good ol' boys/gals club" mentality. They protect their own. It turns into mistreatment of many lower level employees which goes unnoticed as people turn a blind eye to the actions of their friends.

    If you are looking for a "job" Indeed is your place. If you would like a career please do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. There is ZERO room for growth and promotions. Indeed has a propensity to increase your workload, responsibilities and expectations, however this is NOT accompanied by any type of pay raise, promotion or title. You can remain in your same role and pay grade for upwards of 5 years unless you find a way to become friends with your compensation manager. If they find you unpalatable, you will continue to overwork yourself for no benefit. Some teams go as far as give you management responsibilities, but no promotion or title to go with it. You are expected to preform at a management level, however you are still left at an entry level position/pay grade. The company stance on this is you must be doing the job above you (without getting paid for it) for a set number of years before you can be considered for a promotion or as they call it "Level-Up". This is so that you are "not set up for failure" at the next level. This is the convenient spin they put on on it in order to get more production and not pay for it. Promotions are not given to hard working employees like at a normal company, you have to put together a written case to convince people you are ready for a promotion. This is so that managers do not have to be burdened with knowing/caring about their employees accomplishments and progressions. They then put together a panel where the employee's written case is put up against a selected firing squad of managers and directors who try to discredit all of your achievements and take away the validity of all of your hard work (this is also how they do performance reviews). Do yourself a favor, don't work for free, they wont provide you "back pay", and they will not afford you any ounce of respect no matter how much you earn it.

    Pay inequality here is rampant and is tied into the same problems associated with diversity. You are paid based on each compensation managers personal biases.

    This is all my opinion based on what I have seen and experienced with this company, and a cautionary warning to those contemplating working for Indeed. Do not waste valuable years of your career stagnant at Indeed, you will regret the wasted time.

    Advice to Management

    Take a deep hard look inwards and make the changes needed before it is too late and you become the next Tech company in the news with their dirty laundry aired for the world to see. Indeed's reputation is more vulnerable than it has ever been, and the views of a vast majority of employees need to no longer be ignored. So much has been swept under the rug, but it only takes one incident to uncover all of Indeed's skeletons. This is very sad to see what has happened to this once great company and I am rooting for all of the good people still working to make it in the world of Indeed.


  6. Helpful (37)

    "Indeed does not care about black people."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    Open PTO (dependent on department), flexible schedule (dependent on department), free snacks.

    Cons

    I have so many things to say about how Indeed treats their black employees and few of them are good. Let me start by saying, I have worked at Indeed for many years and I have yet to meet another black person who doesn’t feel similarly to the things I will say in this post. I will also say, there aren’t a lot of black employees at Indeed, so if you’re black and looking to join Indeed, don’t expect to see anyone that looks like you and don’t expect the company to listen to what you have to say. Because we are the smallest minority, Indeed disregards us in favor of more “popular” minorities.

    First and foremost, every single day, black employees have to pretend to be someone we’re not so we are easier to digest for the vast majority of white people that run the company. That means, we oftentimes have to water down our personalities so we don’t come off as “too much” for the white people we interact with. For example, if we push for our message to get across, we’re aggressive, not assertive. If we question a decision, we’re uncollaborative, not inquisitive. If we tell our manager we disagree with them, we’re uncontrollable, not providing feedback.

    We have to work three times as hard to be considered on the same level as white employees who don’t care about their job. We also have to be hyper-aware of our emotions and how we are being perceived because we are always one mistake away from being labeled an angry black wo/man or a ratchet hoodlum. It’s truly exhausting.

    Second, I would guess 90% of managers at Indeed have never interacted with black people before and have developed their understanding of black people and black culture based on what they see on TV. In turn, they make assumptions about our interests and how they think they can relate to us. Most of which are grossly wrong.

    On top of that, managers are never taught to manage different types of people, so they manage how they want to manage, instead of how their employees want to be managed. Keep in mind, a majority of Indeed employees are referrals. Who do people refer? Their friends and network. Most Indeed employees are like-minded people with a frat-boy mentality who are incentivized to perform better with promises of happy hours where they can get “white-girl wasted.” Also, because most of Indeed’s employee base consists of these types of people, they’re more likely to become managers and work their way up the ranks.

    Imagine being a black person who didn’t grow up with a frat boy mentality. Imagine being managed by a person who only knows how to socialize and interact with those types of people. Black employees do our best to shift the way we work so we fit in, but at what point will Indeed say enough is enough and be okay with accepting us as is? Why are only black employees changing how they act to fit in? Shouldn’t managers be doing their best to cater their management style based on the preferences of the employee? The company really needs to invest more time and money into diversity management immediately.

    Third, the company refuses to acknowledge current events that affect their black employee base, but are quick to act when a more digestible group, for example the LGBTQ community, is affected. I am writing to let Indeed know that your black employees were and are still scared from all the deaths that happen in our community, the protests against us, the vocal hatred of us simply because of the color of our skin. We wanted something from you, an email, a note, something. You didn’t even have to address the entire company in a message to us. You only had to talk to us, your black employees.

    It breaks my heart to say Indeed was and continues to be silent and pretends that what happens in the world of black people, doesn’t affect Indeed. Newsflash: if it affects your employees, it affects Indeed.

    Fourth, our company is scared of the word “diversity” and only wants to focus on the word “inclusion.” Fine, but how do you get to inclusion without there being a diverse employee base? I have seen with my own eyes new offices open up and immediately get filled with all white people. Those were opportunities to build diverse (excuse me, inclusive) offices from the ground up, but of course, Indeed failed to realize that. No matter how successful Indeed sees those offices, to me, they will always be a failure because they are not reflective of the diverse work force we’re supposedly trying to help get jobs.

    We spend a majority of our time at work. Do you know how frustrating it is to be surrounded by people who don’t look like you for 40 hours a week? Do you know how frustrating it is to worry that you can’t relate to anyone on your team because your tastes in music, TV, activities, are vastly different? Do you know how frustrating it is that jokes you sometimes make fall on deaf ears because they didn’t grow up black and can’t relate to or identify with what you’re saying? For white people, you don’t know how frustrating it is because you are the majority at Indeed.

    Fifth, and my final point, Senior leadership seems to only focus on women when they define any issue with inclusion. They have made it one of, if not their main, priority in attracting a more inclusive workforce to Indeed. While I am all for women’s rights, as a black person, it is incredibly disappointing to see the company prioritize one minority over another and pitch it as more important. Indeed has also never officially recognized blacks as a minority. In speeches, Senior leadership has mentioned a lack of women, initiatives with LGBTQ, but nothing about blacks. It’s like “black” is such a sensitive word and they’d rather dance around it than come out and say it.

    I will say, people love working for Indeed, and I truly want to be one of those people again. I used to be, but my pride in this company has dwindled so dramatically over the years as my voice, and the voice of other blacks within the company, are ignored. When Indeed asks if I would recommend a friend to work here, my answer is always a firm “no.” My friends are black and I would never suggest they join a company where they will feel isolated, unwanted, and easily replaced.

    To my fellow black Indeedians, I STAND WITH YOU AND I AM PROUD OF YOU. I know Indeed is scared of saying that so I wanted to make sure you heard it from someone who recognizes you for who you are - a strong, resilient people.

    To Indeed, I know change doesn't come overnight. However, actions speak louder than words, and your lack of action to make black employees feel included speaks volumes.

    To those reading this that are considering working at Indeed, there are a few managers who I wholeheartedly enjoy working with and interacting with. Unfortunately, the poor lack of action of Indeed as a whole outweighs the positive experiences I've had with those managers.

    Indeed Response

    Dec 19, 2017 – Director of Inclusion

    Thank you so much for sharing your heartfelt story and experiences with us. Our mission to help people get jobs includes hiring and treating all people well inside Indeed. 2017 has been a year of... More


  7. Helpful (1)

    "Exciting projects and amazing benefits"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    Lots of good benefits. The projects are very technically challenging and there are always new problems to solve. There are lot of smart people to learn from.

    Cons

    Upward mobility and moving teams are difficult. They'd rather hire a senior engineer from outside than promote from within.

    Advice to Management

    Be honest and transparent about mobility (both in career and across teams)

  8. Helpful (3)

    "Poor leadership, no opportunities for meaningful growth"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Indeed full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Unlimited PTO (I've never had issues taking it, but some managers are stingy with it)
    - Free food, snacks (although not all offices have meals and honestly, the quality is lower than other tech companies)
    - The work honestly isn't too hard, but that's because we're not doing anything with a grand vision

    Cons

    I've on a team that, like almost all of them, has been rapidly expanding over the past two years. We've hired nearly 90 people, including several managers. Out of all of those people, they've promoted exactly one person to management. The rest of the managers have been external hires. This has caused the current group of managers to be woefully unfamiliar with the skills needed for daily work and the culture of the company. This is a development team, and honestly, except for one or two people, I doubt anyone in management can actually code.

    Which wouldn't be a problem if they were there to be guiding the strategic vision of the team, but they spend most of their time plotting against each other rather than actually articulating the direction. When they finally get their crap together enough to create a Powerpoint, they speak in vague tones about roadmaps and plans, but these never come to fruition. Meanwhile, our technical debt continues to grow and there's no clear process about how to fix it.

    Indeed does not grow its people. They may move you through levels, but don't expect these levels to correspond with anything resembling more responsibility or participation in the strategic vision. The levels are arbitrary and meaningless.

    Also, if you do find yourself taking a job here, make sure you strongly negotiate your salary on the front end because raises are pitiful. I've received multiple promotions and have been here two years and total I've only received a one digit percentage raise. They consider Cost of Living adjustment level raises as equivalent to promotion raises. Meanwhile, I know there are people a level below me making 25% more than I am and I know there's people at my level making even less than I am. There's so much talk internally about pay bands but don't expect any transparency about what they are. That's because they're completely arbitrary and don't make any sense. This lack of clarity is a recipe for disaster regarding pay discrimination and I hope they get called out on this sometime. Also, don't hope to go to your manager to fix this because in the weirdest business decision I've ever seen, they don't actually know what you're paid. Your boss' boss doesn't know what you're paid. Only certain people, somewhere unknowably high in your hierarchy know what you make.

    Advice to Management

    Stop valuing team growth above everything else. Take time to fix pressing problems like you should have done two years ago. The house of cards is getting wobbly.

    Provide legitimate, meaningful career paths for the people who have actually put in the blood, sweat, and tears in growing the company. Consider actually promoting people internally.

    Fix your pay bands. Compensate people fairly based on what they're worth. Implement raises that actual reward people for their loyalty and success. You might actually stop losing your top talent to other tech companies if you do that.

    Stop squabbling at the manager level. Your job should be to listen to your direct reports for problems and then figure out how to solve them, not to pull more and more prestige for yourself.


  9. "One of the best places I've ever worked, probably THE best"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Information Security Analyst in Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Information Security Analyst in Austin, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Indeed full-time

    Pros

    - Work/Life Balance
    - Open PTO
    - Amazing people
    - Amazing Culture
    - Lots of challenges to solve
    - Lots of freedom to solve problems

    Cons

    - Very strict on hiring requirements: A lot of great candidates get passed over due to different teams having different hiring goals. Some of these candidates may have found a great home on another team but are put off by the initial interview

    Advice to Management

    Balance the amazing culture we have with the fact we're growing at the rate we are. Not everything can stay the same, but too much change and we lose what makes us great.


  10. Helpful (17)

    "Bad for women, especially in software engineering"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Austin, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Indeed full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great perks and salary, and depending on the team you get to - smart co-workers and challenging technical work

    Cons

    No more than lip service for diversity initiatives. No viable career path for individual contributors. Women engineers that are not in management languish in the same level for years, and their contributions are not recognized or valued. If you are a female engineer, there are much better companies out there that will value you. Projects and teams randomly move around various engineering offices because they hire too many engineers without actually having a plan for what they would work on. Some engineering managers put on act of being humble while doing nothing to help advance the careers of those who report to them.

    Advice to Management

    Learn from other tech companies that are doing more than just lip service in their diversity initiatives. Do more to seek silent hidden talent in the organization that do a lot of heavy lifting and don't get recognition for it.


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