Manheim Reviews

Updated Aug 5, 2020

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3.6
71%
Recommend to a Friend
84%
Approve of CEO
Manheim President Sandy Schwartz
Sandy Schwartz
192 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "Huge auction so at times it can get overwhelming(in 26 reviews)

  • "Upper management changes too much everyone who comes in tries to reinvent the wheel and the process that has been establishing working there for years(in 17 reviews)

More Pros and Cons
  1. "Very professional"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - CSA Lowes in Duncanville, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Manheim full-time

    Pros

    Great pay the other employees are very friendly and the supervisors get to know you on a personal basis

    Cons

    Very hot in the summer

  2. "Fantastic Employer"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Marketing Coordinator 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Manheim full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Benefits, Work/ Life Balance, Employees, Food, Vacation Time

    Cons

    Favoritism, Pay below standard, Some managers


  3. "Good"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Stager in Statesville, NC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Manheim part-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Lots of nice people to work with

    Cons

    A lot of inefficiency and seeming lack of communication

    Continue reading

    Manheim Response

    July 27, 2020

    Thanks for your review! We are pleased to hear that you are enjoying your time with us. Cheers to more years of service together.

  4. COVID-19

    "Backstabbers"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Parts Coordinator in Tolleson, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Manheim full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Co-workers are nice and friendly to work with.

    Cons

    This is going to be an account of my one year of employment at Manheim Automotive Auto Auctions in Tolleson, AZ as a Parts Coordinator. It was one of the worst experiences I ever had at a company and everybody who is considering working for this company needs to hear my story. Nobody should have to go through what I went through. The company is part of Cox Automotive, which is owned by Cox Industries. On February 25, 2019, I was hired as a Parts Coordinator. Most of my career was in the health insurance industry, but I decided to do a career change. I had some transferable computer skills and was familiar with a lot of car parts because I am a car enthusiast. When I started, I did not even have a computer or telephone on my desk. It took almost to the end of March before I received the computer and I received the telephone about two weeks prior to that with a faulty ethernet cable that kept falling out disabling my telephone. Then it took another two weeks before my computer was loaded with the correct programs I would need to do my job. By this time, it was about the beginning of April before I could start performing my job duties. In the meantime, I was learning other job duties from my department co-workers to help them out. In addition, I was receiving training for my position, although it was never scheduled and was through a mentor. The training was haphazard at best. Here is the start of all my troubles. The training was in another office in the same building. However, the size of the room was about the size of a small bedroom. Similar in size from homes built in the 1980’s and earlier. To say it was cramped is an understatement. Four people worked in the same office, each at an office desk with a tall filing cabinet on top of it. In fact, it was so cramped, that the co-worker would literally back their chair into their co-worker’s chair whenever they got up. This is where my haphazard training took place. I literally had to place my notebook on my lap to take notes, when there was a chair available for me to sit in, that is. When there was not a chair, I had to somehow takes notes standing up for 1-2 hours. In fact, at times, I even had a fan blowing directly into my face while I was trying to train. How management thinks this is conducive to training is beyond me. In addition, I was not trained on everything I needed to learn, which is one of the reasons I was fired. The training lasted about 2 weeks and it was about 2-3 days each week for 2 hours. However, as I stated, I could not use my computer until about the beginning of April, meaning that what I was learning in training all that time I could not even apply to my position until then. My job functions were to request part quotes from automobile dealers and parts stores based on condition reports done by what are known as CR writers in my department. They enter notes and take pictures of the cars they are working on, and then create work orders in the system for each vehicle. I would obtain the quotes and enter them into the system. The vehicles were sent to us from companies, like Hertz, to be re-conditioned so they could be re-sold to the public. The quotes would have to be reviewed by a representative from Hertz. If approved, the quotes would go to our ordering department to be ordered. I had no authority to order parts and no access to the ordering system, which is very important to note and the main reason, as you will see, why I was fired. I finally started to perform my job duties in early April and on May 14, 2019, I was already written up with a Corrective Action Form. Here is where it starts to get very interesting. One of the senior co-workers was asking me why I wasn’t doing one of my job functions and I told him it was because I wasn’t trained on it. When he evidently made my supervisor aware of it, my supervisor started questioning me about it and I told him the same thing, but he didn’t believe me. In fact, he never even asked the person who trained me if she actually did train me on the other job responsibilities. He just assumed it. This happened several times, and I had to be trained on the job responsibilities that I was never trained on. This was the beginning of my supervisor confronting me on many issues due to him not wanting to believe me. In addition, my team lead was making mistakes on part quotes, which I corrected when I received e-mails from the ordering department stating the part numbers were wrong. She did this several time and I brought this up to my supervisor who didn’t do anything about it because he trusted her. That would have cost the company money. Watch how this progressively gets much worse. In one example, one of my department co-workers left a box of wheel covers on a desk for about 3 days before my supervisor asked me why I didn’t place them on the vehicle. I told him I didn’t leave them there and I had no idea why my co-worker placed them there in the first place. In fact, I didn’t even know how to install them or even knew that was my responsibility. Again, a training issue. My supervisor became upset with me with my explanation. Does that even make any sense to become upset at me for an issue that was never created by me or that I was even trained on? Of course not. I am supposed to quote parts and never knew I had to actually install some parts. Why was I never told this in the first place? One of my responsibilities was also to receive parts. When they arrived, I would update the system and either place the parts on shelves for the body shop or walk them back to the mechanics and place them on their very overcrowded shelves. In fac it was so bad on the mechanic shelves, that parts were laying on top of other parts and even on the floor with a work order taped to each of the parts to let them know which vehicle it belonged to. Sometimes, the work order would come off or the parts would go missing somehow. Other times, the parts would be installed and then the system was not updated. So it would show that it still needed to be done, but then the mechanics or body shop installer would ask me where the part was. When that happened, I would be questioned on what happen to the part. It’s not in my back pocket so, how would I know when I gave them the parts. They lost it and then I get blamed for it. Of course, again, my supervisor would start questioning me. By this time, he no trust in me at all. It was pretty obvious. This gets far more interesting from here on. In fact, it became so bad that I had to start keeping a spreadsheet of these issues, until I became so swamped, that I had to stop updating it. In another example, one of the CR writers wrote up a Ford truck to have the front bumper replaced along with a picture. I called a Ford dealer for a quote, entered it into the system where it was approved for order, and it was ordered by our ordering department. The bumper came in and was installed. However, there was a second part to the bumper that needed to be ordered and was never notated by the CR writer and the picture did not show a second part that you could see. Guess who got blamed for this? ME. My supervisor came to me and lied stating I was told by three people that I was told about this second part. Second guessing myself, I asked each of them and they all confirmed they never told me this. I stated this to my supervisor and he just stated, Okay, and walked away. Very professional of him, isn’t it? One of the issues I was also written up for was to verify the parts the CR writers stated was need for a vehicle was to walk out to the vehicle itself and verify the part that was needed. Then what is the purpose of a CR writer? Is my supervisor stating, indirectly, that they a CR writer cannot be trusted? I didn’t mind doing that when we were slow with 5-7 work orders per day, but when they increased to 30-35 per day, I don’t have time to do that. There are timelines that to be met based on client requirements. I could go on and on with many more examples, but I think you can get the picture now. So, I was written up for the first time on May 14, 2019, as I stated earlier. The next time I was written up was on July, 25, 2019. In between there, I met one on one with my supervisor about these and other issues. The last time, and only other time I was written up, was on January 6, 2020. Between July 25, 2019 and January 6, 2020, my supervisor never met with me. Therefore, I was under the impression I was doing better. In fact, in approximately September, I brought up the fact with my HR representative that my last Corrective Action was July 25, 2020 and I have not heard anything since then. Of course, she was updated about the Corrective Actions forms and stated I “should talk to my supervisor about this instead of leaving me hanging”. Her exact words. Should she not be involved in asking him this too? Now for the worst part. Yes, it gets much worse. About a week before I was written up for the last time on January 6, 2020, I e-mailed my supervisor to let him know I needed to take off a day the week of January 5th, 2020 because my wife was having surgery on January 9, 2020 and I needed to drive her home. I e-mailed him three times with no response. I finally had to ask his manager instead, who told me it would be okay. Then, I was fired on January 9, 2020 and the benefits ended on January, 10, 2020. My supervisor knew my wife was having surgery based on my three e-mails I sent to him, yet had no empathy and fired me the day before the surgery. Talk about a shock. Luckily, I was able to convince my HR representative, who has empathy, to make my termination date January 13, 2020 so the surgery would be covered by my health insurance. Very grateful for that. However, my wife and I had to decide about whether or not to go through with the surgery, which could have ended up turning into serious condition, possibly life threatening, if it was postponed indefinitely. Can you imagine what my wife and I were going through because of my supervisor? The reason I was fired was for a final issue, which was a complete lie and there is an e-mail to prove it. I received a work order from a CR writer to request a Jaguar quote. I obtained the quote and told the Jaguar dealer parts technician, that it would probably be approved later in the day. The dealer parts technicians are not supposed to deliver orders until they are approved. That goes for every dealer in the country. However, this parts technician decided to be pro-active and show good will, I believe, and shipped the part. When I received it the next day, the part was still not ordered and we received an invoice. That day or maybe a day later, I went back and forth by e-mail with our ordering department questioning this. I stated the dealer parts technician took it upon himself to delver the part. There were about 8-10 e-mails between me and the person who is responsible for paying the invoices. In the end, she actually thanked me after accusing me that I gave authorization to the dealer part technician to deliver the part. She thanked me, because this has happened more than once in the past and she didn’t know why. Now she did. If I knew what was going to come, I would have printed the e-mail out and kept it. About 2-3 days later, I filed for unemployment. I was denied because the company stated I was fired for misconduct. Of course, I wasn’t and filed an appeal. What an ordeal this turned out to be. I received appeal paperwork from the Department of Economic Security (DES) Appeals Department stating I could subpoena information to help support my case. Guess what I requested the subpoena for? The e-mail about the Jaguar part. The administrative Law Judge (ALJ) denied it because he stated it did not support my case. The e-mail was dated December 27, 2019. I originally requested the person who I sent the e-mail to, to have her send it to me, several times, with no response. On March 9, 2020, I had telephone hearing between me, the ALJ, my supervisor, his manager and one of their legal representatives. Guess what the judge was referring to for most of the hearing? The e-mail from December 27, 2019 that I requested to be subpoenaed. Isn’t that interesting? It was not important enough to support my appeal, yet important enough for the judge to use so he could make a decision on whether or not I would win the appeal. Really??? Since the person I e-mailed on December 27, 2019 about the Jaguar part was not present as a witness to dispute my what I stated in the hearing, I won the case. Because I won it, I also received the Covid-19 benefit as well. How fitting and all due to my persistence to only prove I was not at fault about everything that happened to me there. By the way, my supervisor was fired three times by the company and re-hired each time. Are you kidding me? In addition, I was informed that there were many people who did not like him. I won’t go into details about it, suffice to say, it was pretty extreme in some cases. In the end, I think a lot of this had to do with me not being very sociable with my supervisor, but I had not time because there were deadlines to meet. I think he took it as me being rude. Not sure, but a good guess. In fact, I was so busy, that I even stayed late to get my work done so the deadlines could be met, but of course, my supervisor thought I was trying to fleece the company by trying to earn more money. If I have work to do, I do it the same day until it is completed. That is my work ethic. Of course, my supervisor was not worried about meeting deadlines when it came to me working late, but was concerned about meeting them during normal working hours. How does that even make sense? A deadline is a deadline. Period. Are you still sure you want to work for this company? What happened to me could happen to you.

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  5. "Keeps you fit"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Quadrant in Riverside, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Manheim full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Lots of walking, alone time, can listen to my podcasts and music (only 1 ear).

    Cons

    Pay, working in rain and heat waves, wind, carrying around 10lb printer all day

    Continue reading

    Manheim Response

    June 26, 2020

    Thanks for your review! We are pleased to hear that you enjoyed your time with us and the benefit of getting extra steps in while getting your work done. We know that jobs in the auctions can certainly be a challenge with unpredictable weather, and we appreciate your feedback. Best of luck to you in your future career endeavors.

  6. COVID-19

    "People need to know about this company"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Shuttle Driver in Baltimore, MD
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Manheim part-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    value employees, take care of us, bring in ice cream trucks on hot days, paid us when not working for COVID-19, General Manager comes out and checks on people if they get hurt, work/life balance

    Cons

    None - they bend over backwards for their employees

    Continue reading

    Manheim Response

    June 1, 2020

    We are thrilled to hear that you are enjoying your time at Manheim! Thank you for taking the time to leave your feedback. We love taking care of our people, and hearing such positive feedback. Cheers to more years together!

  7. "Changing company culture and business norms"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Finance in Atlanta, GA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Manheim full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Manheim is a dependable company with deep pockets.

    Cons

    Manheim has made a dramatic cultural shift in the past few years, which has been felt by every employee and every customer.

    Continue reading

    Manheim Response

    June 1, 2020

    Hi, thanks for your review. While change helps us remain competitive, we also know that it can feel uncomfortable, that’s why we put our people first as we constantly look to innovate our services and evolve our business. We are disappointed to see you go, but we appreciate the time that you spent with us. Best of luck to you in your next career journey. Cheers!

  8. "Decent Company"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Photographer 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Manheim full-time

    Pros

    Management seems to care about subordinates

    Cons

    Working outside in the elements (cold/heat)

    Manheim Response

    May 18, 2020

    Thank you for your review! We are happy hear that you have enjoyed your experience thus far! Thank you for sharing your experience with us!

  9. COVID-19

    "Awesome company!"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Arbitrator I in Cincinnati, OH
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Manheim full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    My first day at Manheim just happened to be the first day of the Covid19 quarantine. They have allowed me to work from home, which is amazing. They really take care of their employees!

    Cons

    Nothing I can think of.

    Manheim Response

    May 18, 2020

    We are thrilled to hear that your experience has been awesome! Thank you for taking the time to leave your feedback. Cheers to more years together!

  10. "Great company"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Technician in Bordentown, NJ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Manheim full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Excellent work environment good benefits.

    Cons

    None that I can think of

Found 476 reviews