Rockwell Automation FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Rockwell Automation Reviews and are not edited or altered.

34 English questions out of 34

May 27, 2020

What are perks and other benefits like at Rockwell Automation?

Pros

Great pay, great perks. The people for the most part are very nice.

Cons

There aren't a ton of new ideas - just tenured employees figuring out things that other companies did 10 years ago. People tend to get hired into bigger positions based on politics and how long you've been at the company. I guess that's normal, but within a company whose competitors are basically outflanking them left and right, you should stop relying on the sales programs to bring in new people. If you do rely on this, fine. But in this new world of digital, it doesn't take an engineer to realize that bringing in outside people and actually listening to them is a strategy for success.

Great pay, great perks.

May 27, 2020

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August 29, 2020

What is health insurance like at Rockwell Automation?

Pros

work life balance, good work environment

Cons

health insurance so so,deductible high

health insurance so so,deductible high

August 29, 2020

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January 20, 2020

Does Rockwell Automation offer tuition reimbursement?

Pros

I'm finding hard to find many pros of working at least at the facility I was employed at. The benefits were pretty good, and it was very motivating to get me back to school to finish my degree.

Cons

- The facility is consistently understaffed. This is due to a number of different factors and eventually compounds itself. One of them is their lean principals. When they talk lean, they don't talk about efficiency. They talk about trimming everything down to nothing but a skeleton in order to 'cut costs'. Work is frequently scheduled in an attempt to make near the exact number of units needed based upon current inventory and forecasting. A noble idea, but the execution is quite poor and ends up requiring overtime to meet basic production needs at any given time. And because of a lack of staff, as previously mentioned, you may be forced to work overtime. - Of course, this all leads to a horrible work-life balance. As a side effect of that, it's often very difficult to plan vacation, as only a very small amount of people may have any given day off. - There also appears to be very little oversight when it comes to process engineering. Often, process engineers will perform time studies and analyses on their own proposed process 'improvements' instead of having another engineer perform them or audit them. This has often led to bizarre and counterproductive changes in process. Some process engineers will also only perform studies on certain associates, as said associates can guarantee their desired metrics. - Management quality varies wildly. Some managers micromanage and are incredibly unprofessional. Management is also quick to dismiss the needs and concerns of manufacturing associates if it means spending any amount of money that cannot be considered a tax write-off. For the longest time, pay was under average for the area and by a significant amount. - HR is ineffective at best and working against the company at worst. When I worked there, the points system for attendance was not cohesive and HR could easily have a different points tally for any employee than said employee's supervisor/manager. I additionally attempted to return after leaving to finish my degree, only to be strung along the hiring process for four weeks. Within that time, I was interviewed for a position at a different company (and in three different interviews, mind you), sent an offer, accepted, and onboarded within a week. - Management outside of the facility and the ombudsman are very slow to react, if they even listen. Quite frequently, concerns posted to Global Voices are left unresolved and even unlooked at. - There is virtually no room for career development if you are a manufacturing associate, regardless of your education and other experience. Even if you meet the requirements for a non-MA position and interview well, you will likely be passed by. The tuition reimbursement program, when I worked there, was also a joke with ridiculous and unrealistic deadlines.

Advice to Management

- Don't stop being lean, but reassess what it means to be lean. Actually take what Toyota does, wholesale, and employ it. Don't only use the parts that sound like they will save the company money (because down the line, they don't by themselves. They end up incurring a cost). - Get rid of all the micromanagement and unprofessionalism and develop a cohesive managment team, even if this means getting rid of managers that have been there for over a decade. - Listen to all employees, not just managment. - Implement an accountability system for process engineers. - Reassess employee mobility and implement new avenues for associates to grow and move up. - Work on allowing a better work-life balance. - Improve HR processes. - Bring in more staff.

The tuition reimbursement program, when I worked there, was also a joke with ridiculous and unrealistic deadlines.

January 20, 2020

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June 27, 2018

What is paid time off like at Rockwell Automation?

Pros

work-balance friendly good atmosphere benefits (social, vacation, multisport, coffee machine etc.)

Cons

salary not market driven problems with getting salary increase

benefits (social, vacation, multisport, coffee machine etc.)

June 27, 2018

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August 14, 2019

Does Rockwell Automation have an auto lease program?

Pros

flexible schedule exposure to lots of companies

Cons

little to no mentorship need your own car

need your own car

August 14, 2019

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34 English questions out of 34