Gusto Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Gusto Interview Questions

Updated Nov 15, 2018
272 Interview Reviews

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Candidate Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Outbound Sales Representative Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Gusto (Denver, CO) in August 2017.

    Interview

    Phone interview then in-person round with three back to back interviews. My recruiter interviewed me, then once she believed I was the right fit, she gave me a lot of helpful information to be prepared for my interview. If you can impress the recruiter, she will become your greatest ally and cheerleader. They are mostly interested in people who have a "sales personality" more than someone who has sales experience.

    Interview Questions

    • Are you a competitive person?   1 Answer

  2.  

    People Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a staffing agency. The process took 1+ week. I interviewed at Gusto (San Francisco, CA) in June 2016.

    Interview

    The interview process was a very positive experience. Each interviewer had a different style of conducting interviews, which made the process more intriguing and less repetitive. All interviewers were very knowledgable about the company's mission, vision, and goals. As a result, they were able to answer all questions to the fullest extent. Going through the interview process and walking around the office made it beyond evident that everyone was excited to be working at the company and truly believed in the company.

    Interview Questions

  3.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took a week. I interviewed at Gusto (Denver, CO) in October 2018.

    Interview

    I first talked to a recruiter and talked about what I was interested in, my experience, and the roles available. I then did a coding interview where I was on screen share with a developer and had a to finish a task. It was not a particularly hard task. Although it was not hard, I ended up not getting an offer because of not knowing the syntax (which ultimately happened because of a small change between python2 and python3 that I was unaware of). Everyone I talked to was extremely nice and overall the experience was good.

    Interview Questions


  4. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Interview

    Phone interview and typical onsite. Their office is out in the middle of nowhere. Your commute is going to be very depressing. And they are running a payroll SaaS app, but everyone from the founder down thinks they are Buddhas bringing enlightenment for the masses

    Interview Questions


  5.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Interview

    2 technical screens, 1 onsite in SF with 2 technical interviews and a personality interview. HR was really easy to work with and flexible with deadlines, and everything got scheduled really quickly.

    Interview Questions


  6.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Gusto (San Francisco, CA) in April 2018.

    Interview

    Initial Phone call. Technical call. Onsite. Pretty typical, the questions are also relatively easy - nothing that's really hard on the leetcode scale. The one thing you definitely need to do is to vocalize and explain every part of your thought process.

    The great thing was after I got rejected, they offered to tell me the team's feedback over a phone call. They even went into feedback of some of the specific parts of the interview. Not a lot of companies will do this, so I definitely give them huge props for this.

    Interview Questions


  7. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Gusto (Denver, CO) in January 2018.

    Interview

    In short, this was the most personal and accomodating interview process I've ever experienced. Gusto treats people with such respect and hospitality it is hard to believe. They have invested so much thought and effort into taking care of people. I would highly recommend Gusto to anyone.

    An existing Gusto engineer recommended me for the position via an email introduction. I then had a few emails and phone calls assessing feasibility. After this, I was directed to a recruiter who assisted me throughout the rest of the process. The recruiter always followed up right away after my scheduled meetings to assess my experience, provide answers to my questions, and setup next steps.

    I had two separate one-hour remote interviews consisting of some conversation and a coding challenge via coder pad. One interview included a common algorithm and one included an interesting algorithm I had not seen before. At some point, I had also spoken to the Engineering Manager in more detail about the company and role.

    I was then flown to Denver, CO for some final onsite interviews. This was half a day of office tours, code challenges, and culture discussions.

    Interview Questions

    • I was asked to solve a problem involving somewhat of a pathfinding algorithm. Given a hallway with a set of lights in various positions and of various light casting radii, determine if the hallway can be crossed while remaining in the unlit areas of the hallway.   Answer Question
  8. Helpful (7)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at Gusto.

    Interview

    1) Engineering Manager Chat
    It was nice that you chat with an engineering manager upfront, rather than a recruiter. However, they didn't make this clear. If they had, I would have prepared more EM-specific questions.

    2) Phone screen #1
    Compare a hash table by key and by value, including recursively flattening nested hash tables. This was done in a coder pad.

    3) phone screen #2
    Given the radius / x and y coordinates of the middle of a list of circles, and the height of the y axis, determine if a grid is traversible on the x axis by a 1x1 square. Because yeah, computational geometry is totally relevant to a Ruby on Rails app that does payroll and benefits for small businesses, right?


  9. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through other source. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Gusto (San Francisco, CA) in February 2018.

    Interview

    One phone fit assessment which lead to , 2 successive phone technical screens. Very interesting and stimulating conversations in each session.

    And this lead to 1 day onsite interview consisting of :
    One session of pair programming. The interviewer was super helpful in coding in languages I am not familiar with, based on my questions and suggested solution. We were working on a real bug/enhancement reported by customer. I thought I had asked all the right questions and implemented the solution. I did ask the interviewer that all the issues reported were addressed and I was given the impression of a yes.

    One session of technical interview: I got talking for a few minutes longer and had about 40 mins for real problem. The basics of the problem is finding top K values from a data set. I immediately knew it was a heap solution that I needed to implement. In my rush I took longer to determine if it was min-Heap or max-Heap….and then started the implementation. My interviewer was interested in the Heap solution, said he learned something new. I discusses the implementation of Heap as array and as asked for started implementing min-Heap as array and adding extension of top-K. It has been about 20 months since I had implemented Heap as array, so straightening out the jumble of thoughts in my brain and putting it to code did not get finished in remaining time. I am not the kind of developer to be able to implement a min-Heap in arrays and add top-K extension as almost working code in 40 mins. It takes me slightly longer time.

    One session of cultural fit interview: We spoke about ‘why Gusto’, how I would react to hypothetical scenarios and my professional history. I felt like this was a place I would love slogging for!

    All the three interviewers were extremely congenial. As a trained engineer I reacted in a binary format: a nod and words of praise meant approval. Until later in the evening I mentally went through the other Glassdoor reviewers’ experiences and realized that the interviewers were congenial by nature, but it in no way guaranteed approval. I was proven right when I was told my candidacy will not go through. In their opinion, I was below their expectations in pair programming and technical interview sessions.

    Why am I writing this review? I liked their product. I liked what I read about the company, culture, and how they did their product in relation to the customers they serve. All the people I interacted with were super nice. It’s just that I do want to make future interviewers be aware that congenial smile or praise does not mean you have that vote. As is their prerogative, they do make choices based on their hiring philosophy that they know “what makes a person great at Gusto”. I enjoyed the process, and found it worth my time.

    Interview Questions


  10. Helpful (4)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Gusto (San Francisco, CA) in November 2017.

    Interview

    During my undergrad I went through a ton of interviews of internships at nearly every company under the sun. After securing an internship for the summer I'd continue interviewing just to get more practice. I've had bad interview and good interviews. My interview at Gusto was somewhere in the middle.

    My interview consisted of a "culture/technical fit" phone screen where the interviewer asked about my background, what I was looking for in a company, that sort of thing. He was nice and friendly, and answered all of my questions. The next step was a technical phone interview. I destroyed this phone interview with extreme prejudice. The HR leader told me that I got two "Strong Yes" ratings from my interviewers which was "very rare".

    The next step is an onsite interview, consisting of two technical interviews, a behavioral interview, and a "pair programming" interview. I basically bombed my first technical interview, but I also don't think I was given a fair shot at getting it right. When the interviewer arrived, the IDE on his computer was completely misconfigured and he had to spend several minutes fixing the key binding so that I could save a file a test it... After we got further, his machine could not import one class into another. So after he explained the problem, which was quite comprehensive and sprawling, I perhaps had 30 minutes of actual time to implement a solution to a very large problem after he got his machine to work correctly. Looking at solutions to this problem on GeeksForGeeks, I can see that they use a preexisting priority queue data structure that takes a comparator as an argument; whereas in this interview you have to implement the comparator, implement the queue, then implement the larger problem. After I was rejected, the HR lead gave me feedback and told me that most candidates get more test cases passing. When I told her the problems my interviewer had getting his machine to work, she responded "that's a bummer".

    The next technical interview went far better than the previous one, but according to HR lead I did not get a "Yes" from this interview because I didn't "step back and look at the bigger picture" when implementing the solution, even though my solution worked and the interviewer gave me great feedback during the interview itself ("yes!", "perfect", "I like that you did this, I like that you did that"). My solution was well implemented, clean, and optimal, so I'm not sure what else I could've done better. It's worth noting that this interviewer used CoderPad whereas the previous interviewer used his own IDE.

    The behavioral fit/culture interview is mostly to measure your intellectual curiosity, how you respond to feedback, etc.. A basic culture fit HR interview. I received a "Yes" from this interview.

    HR will claim that you don't need experience in their stack to pass the pair programming section, but that is totally and completely false. Had I known what this interview would have entailed, I would have spent hours studying Rails instead of Gusto's product. You are evaluated on how much you take charge in a foreign code base, which you will obviously have an easier time understanding if you know the intimate details of Rails and Rspec. I also think it is just difficult to use another person's software development environment, and excel in it in an interview setting. Software engineers key bind everything, so it can be nearly impossible to just up and switch to an entirely different set up in the span of an hour, under interview pressure.

    Ultimately, I didn't really enjoy the interview as much as I would have hoped. I studied the product quite a bit, and used a demo instance of it available on their website for several hours. I also researched their partner integrations, and had an hour+ long discussion with the owner a small business that uses their product, and took extensive notes. I was very, very eager to work for Gusto. Typically I try to play it a bit cooler, but I decided to change my approach given my attraction to their product and mission.

    Given the dissonance in result and difficulty from one interview to the next, I think Gusto's interview process depends far too heavily on sheer luck. All the questions are sourced from the same pool and vary wildly in difficulty and scope. Some of them are just not suitable as interview questions given the amount of time they must be answered in. I also think the first interviewer's computer problems are just completely unacceptable, considering the amount of preparation time I put in to researching the product and the company. I sunk a number of hours into preparing for this interview, studying the product, etc.. and my interviewer couldn't even be bothered to take 5 minutes to prepare the question and prepare his environment.


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