Scholastic Reviews | Glassdoor

Scholastic Reviews

Updated November 13, 2018
672 reviews

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3.1
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Scholastic Chairman, President, and CEO Dick Robinson
Dick Robinson
243 Ratings

672 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • "Upper Management can be somewhat disengaged" (in 56 reviews)

  • "Little room for growth, few options to move up in the company" (in 15 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Production"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Production Associate in Saint Louis, MO
    Current Employee - Production Associate in Saint Louis, MO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Scholastic full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Great place to work

    Cons

    Just preparing for unpaid time off

    Advice to Management

    Doing great job , just periodic raises would be great ..


  2. "Significant improvements in the last year, still a bit more to go"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Scholastic full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Pay has improved drastically after a couple months of retention issues that leadership acknowledged in private but scoffed at when questioned
    - Workplace benefits have improved - free coffee, snacks every day, bagels once a week, fully stocked fridge
    - career development opportunities have improved; new proof-of-concept program and hackathons give developers a chance to make an impact on the company with personal projects that can be picked up and funded

    Cons

    - Location - not much can be done about WHERE the office is, but more can be done about what it looks like. Paint the walls, put out some plants, give some life to the environment so that you're encouraging creativity among your engineers
    - Get better about recognizing your problem teams and managers; certain leads have a warped view of how to engage with their team members, leading to situations where they're given way too much work with little to no say about what the real effort it. They put some of their engineers in a position to fail and that doesn't have a clear way of being reported up the chain
    - PTO and healthcare benefits suck

    Advice to Management

    Keep listening to your engineers - they're the ones keeping your business running. Invest in your employees, remember they're not code monkeys, and give us some color!

  3. "Good"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Scholastic part-time

    Pros

    We receive some free books at our season kick off each year. We are putting books into childrens' hands.

    Cons

    Raises are small. One bad employee makes it hard for all.


  4. "Fantastic Mission"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Scholastic full-time

    Pros

    Dedicated to literacy and education. Many opportunities to build products that have positive impact on kids, parents and teachers.

    Cons

    Strategy generally comes from the top and they could improve portfolio management to align the work of the multiple business units.

    Advice to Management

    Reduce the competition among the business units and create better alignment so more energy can be focused on delivering great products.


  5. "Great benefits but frustrating big company!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Sales
    Current Employee - Sales
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Scholastic full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Excellent benefits and company reputation! Quality books.

    Cons

    Too many different divisions at the company are confusing for the customers, and breeds infighting among divisions.

    Advice to Management

    Need better communication and cooperation between the divisions. Upper management need to listen to feedback from the frontline.


  6. "IT department"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

    I worked at Scholastic full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Good people to work with. Good work life balance

    Cons

    IT upper management seems to have different agenda then the user community


  7. "Scholastic"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends

    I have been working at Scholastic full-time

    Pros

    It is a Friendly environment, fast paced, hands on

    Cons

    Their are no downsides to this job

  8. "Book Fairs consultant"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Scholastic full-time

    Pros

    I enjoy working with the people in my office.

    Cons

    poorly constructed CRM, lack of vision by upper level management, major competitor


  9. "Love children books"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Scholastic full-time

    Pros

    If you have thing for children books, these guys are the place to work

    Cons

    Pay can be lacking. Because they rely on children book lovers who will work for less


  10. Helpful (7)

    "Tons of Potential - No Follow Up"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Software Developer in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Associate Software Developer in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Scholastic full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I'd like to start the review with positives, because that's how Glassdoor forces me to do it anyway. I was an associate software developer at Scholastic for nearly a year there and I can say it had a lot of promise but ended up being such a terrible dud.

    Pros:
    - Work/Life balance: No one really cares much, ended up working from home often. If you value little work, you can get away with it. I tried my best to keep busy, but even then I'd have a ton of downtime.
    - Other developers were generally nice and there to help.
    - Make you believe that things would move towards a tech driven company

    Cons

    Cons...where do I begin.
    - Salary: Abysmal. Way below average for NYC developers. They tried to give us "quarterly reviews" to string us along for better salaries...but why should I way 2 years to get paid properly?
    - Poor usage of developers: So much young talent, so little exploration in technologies. Very old practices that have died out, refusal to look at anything new. People get too comfortable there and progress is hindered.
    - Career roadmap: They expect you to have a maximum of 2 years before you go from associate to regular software developer. 2 years is too long to be an associate. I saw a few very competent developers get milked for a cheaper price because of this 2 year thing.
    - Management: I had lost 2 managers within 3 months of each other. One was a little too hands on with me, which is fine, but the other barely ever spoke to me and gave me no direction. I was without a manager for a couple of more months, with a lot of nothing to do, before I left.
    - Location: We were moved from a nice Midtown office to some warehouse in nowheresville Hudson Yards. Undoubtedly this was to save money, fine, but the warehouse was ugly and going to it every day made me feel like a robot. The place was all white and had no interior design at all. Commuting there was hell, as no trains were nearby. No food nearby, just some cafeteria downstairs. When we got there, upper management promised that they'd leverage their Scholastic IP and connections to really brighten up the place, add color and life to it...nope. 10 months later (including up until today, where I asked former employees) and still nothing. The engineers were sent to this warehouse, meanwhile the others are in the nice, very very roomy, Soho office. Yup...go figure.
    - Layoffs: Some random day, upper management had just decided to lay off a ton of employees. Very random, cut within a moment. Meanwhile, they have a ton of upper management who do nothing and none of them were cut (probably got raises as well). We lost a lot of developers within an instant. They didn't get a nice two week notice. Really made it easy to hand in my sub-2 week notice later on. This led to MANY other developers leaving because of fear of job security, putting a ton of pressure on those who stayed.
    -Product owners: Terrible people. During agile sprint planning they would CONSISTENTLY try and nudge developers to lower points on tickets to get as much tickets in as they can to maximize velocity. It was gross and totally against agile.
    - Offshore developers: Yeah, maintaining a 3 million line codebase where you see a lot of if(true) is not fun. We have way too many offshore devs, and the entire old codebase was made by them, so good luck trying to add a simple feature. This techstack is old and gross, to their benefit the developers were trying to move forward but they never got enough time to do it. It never got there.
    - Broken promises: CTO claimed to be going tech-centric in our first large meeting, completely backpedaled from that and told us they were going to be business oriented again. This led to the misuse of developers. A lot of fake talk about "we want you guys to explore technologies" but never giving us the time, hackathons, or anything to really go outside the bounds of a feature. Unless you were creating a new service, you had to play by old rules. And even with new services many times you were at the mercy of changing your technologies to work with the old systems because they couldn't give time to update theirs.

    I came to realize they didn't care about their developers much, the cared about upper management and metrics a ton more. Bad salary, bad coding practices, bad people, just overall a bad time. The only fun you can get is ragging on the company with the other associates and getting excited for them when they decide to actually progress their career. The atmosphere there was gloom towards the end, no one actually wanted to be there unless they were in a prominent position.

    Advice to Management

    Stop lying, start keeping those promises you made months ago. Offer what people are worth. Leverage the talent you have properly. There is a ton of hidden talent there that is being underutilized or utilized in the wrong way. Developers aren't cattle and aren't meant to be seen as so replaceable, that's how you start to quickly lose your developers.

    This company will lose more developers, I'm hoping that becomes a wake up call to management when they do. and without some changes at the top will lose their spot in this world real quick.


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