Netflix Reviews | Glassdoor

Netflix Reviews

Updated December 5, 2018
810 reviews

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3.7
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Netflix Founder, Chairman and CEO Reed Hastings
Reed Hastings
565 Ratings

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Pros
Cons
  • "High turnover rate, culture of fear" (in 30 reviews)

  • "Work life balance is based on your team culture and your boss" (in 30 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "QA Tester Contractor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Great personalities, great work culture, free food, great tech help

    Cons

    None really at all at the moment


  2. Helpful (51)

    "How much does a functioning human cost?"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Netflix full-time

    Pros

    - Paycheck
    - So many good people
    - Such a great service
    - Hope

    Cons

    I have been working for a year at Netflix.

    I've seen what was supposed to be very mature people, sharing absolutely almost no contact that anyone would qualify as "human".
    Sure, that sounds hyperbolic, let me develop (and maybe cherry-pick a little).

    Have you heard about our culture? The one about giving candid feedback? - I have seen people complaining of behavior they literally demonstrated themselves in the following days.
    But I have also seen these feedbacks resulting in tears both in the eyes of HR persons or fellow engineers. How human does that sound?

    Have you heard about our culture? The one about not tolerating brilliant jerks? I have nonetheless seen angriness and frustration, expressed in private, public and meeting. People rejecting new ideas by default, like, any ideas they wouldn't have worked themselves on for days wouldn't count. Even if those ideas are from the best examples in the industry or academics. How many publications/contributions have you seen from Netflix to computer science in general? How does it compare against any other company of that size in the Bay Area? Can you imagine either the real insecurity (x)or the lack of innovation that could lead to this situation?

    Except for a few managers, directors or VPs feeling free enough to behave at work in the same way than how they live, almost every engineer I have been interacting with, have shared as little as possible about their private life.
    The rare exceptions of interpersonal exchange ends up around some sort of competitive behavior: Who is the most geeky, sportive, owns the fastest car/biggest house/visited the strangest place.

    I've heard workaholic people complaining about ambitious peers who were over-managing, over-working to get even more work to do after. I feel like we're past workaholism at this point.

    Maybe there are a lot of shy people! Maybe there is a culture of fear, not only of being fired, but also a fear of interacting with people going to be fired.
    Maybe it's all in my head, maybe people giving 5 stars to their experience here don't care the human aspect of a company. And maybe they're right.

    What about your crush, your fears, your desires for the future, your appetite for life? I've been blessed to work in enough large companies to know that the behavior that I'm seeing in Netflix is not a healthy one. I've also been lucky enough to work in other industries more socializing than tech and I can tell that Netflix has a lot to do on that side, and off-sites or team meeting won't solve that problem.

    I am afraid about the tragic, but inevitable consequences of the ways people operate in this company: I guess that the day the worst will happen, it will be addressed in an impersonal memo by Reed; followed-up by 1 or 2 reminders during offsites. Possibly commented by HR in a Q&A document. And move on. This company seems as reactive in its management of people as it is proactive in its business operations.

    I still work at Netflix though, not only for the paycheck, but because I hope. I hope it will change. The needed change can't happen from a candid feedback, a Q&A, or only from inside.
    Change has to come from everyone, including people who take time to read comments like this one. Netflix has so many good people and offers such a great service.

    As a curious Netflix employee reading this review: think about your past, isn't there a big human thing that you would love to feel again in your current company that you've felt in the past?

    As a candidate: think about what would be a good question to ask to that HR partner once your package is almost here to be offered to you, think about that comment you make at the end of an interview when you're being asked by an engineer: "Do you have any question for me?"
    What Netflix needs is an inception, something that anyone and everyone would think about after leaving the call or the room they were sharing with you.
    Ask yourself, and then the others, the question you should ask if you think you want to spend a good amount of your life and energy in the place you're applying for.

    - Will I learn and contribute to the knowledge of other's? Even outside the company?
    - Will I see emotional responses from my peers? Will that be for other reasons than being fired or bluntly criticized?
    - Will I find a friendly environment that will nurture my appetite for life?
    - What is the amount of emotional interaction (celebrating, sharing, playing) to expect from a company whose service is the best to "entertain"?
    - Do androids dream of electric sheep?

    Advice to Management

    Ask yourself those questions

  3. "Netflix Editor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Video Editor in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Video Editor in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Netflix full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Excellent Projects with Pros from throughout the Entertainment Industry

    Cons

    Still setting the feel of the company


  4. "I love it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    It was great and i loved it

    Cons

    Not enough free snack especially chips


  5. "Operations Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Netflix full-time

    Pros

    Great Benefits, pay, location, with great management

    Cons

    Dvd business continuing to decline.

    Advice to Management

    none


  6. Helpful (7)

    "Great company, with some growing pains"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Netflix full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    When they say that Netflix chooses stunning colleagues, they are not kidding: I am constantly impressed with the smart, thoughtful people I work with on a daily basis. I love the company's focus on Inclusion & Diversity (and, I honestly notice it often, by looking around the room and seeing faces like mine in every meeting), and I am continually impressed at how the company adheres to these principles. The transparency is usually great, and it's fun to be a part of an exciting, growing company. The salary is exceptional, and the benefits are also excellent (note: hourly employees get slightly less in terms of benefits, but it's still great).

    There's a lot of freedom here to set your schedule and work around personal commitments if you need to (e.g. my kid has a doctor's appointment, I will be WFH, etc.), as well as to make decisions that benefit the company, your team, etc.

    The culture deck is intimidating when you first read it, but I have found that it's pretty right on - there are some things that I think are not adhered to quite as often as it says, but overall, it's on point.

    Cons

    Work life balance is a thing, but I do think a lot of it is how well you defend your boundaries - I work a couple of hours of OT a week, and I am generally "on call" in the sense that I will check my email after hours, but I am not expected to work at off hours - in fact, my manager specifically tells me to wait until I am back at work to complete things. I do think upper management works very long hours, and that can lead to burn-out. The flip side of this is that there is a lot of flexibility to take vacation/personal time, and people trust you if you need to take some time for doctor's appointments, stuff for your kids, WFH, etc.

    The firing culture doesn't seem to touch ICs as much as it does management. It is scary sometimes to see those messages come through, but the leaders do try to set context and make themselves available for comments, questions, concerns, etc.

    I do think the whole concept of good ideas coming from anywhere is true to some extent, but it definitely depends on the team and the leader to whom you are pitching things. You have to be smart about choosing the right time/people.

    The onboarding/training needs a lot of work. Not having a solid training for new hires was stressful and alienating. I spent the first few months wondering if I had made the right choice by coming here, but I am a year in, and feeling much more comfortable. They say it takes about 3 months to feel like you are not drowning, and 6 months to feel like you understand everything - that feels pretty accurate to me.

    Advice to Management

    Bolster your training for new managers (especially when they are hired from outside the company).


  7. Helpful (35)

    "Culture of fear is real, tone deaf culture that ignores any voices that doesn't sound like their echo chamber"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Gatos, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Gatos, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Netflix full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    - Great place if you love a high base salary.
    - There's free food.
    - Benefits are decent.

    Cons

    - The culture of fear that's been talked about by some of the other reviewers is absolutely real and persistent at Netflix. People pretend it doesn't apply to them or they don't feel the fear (and will lie in meetings when asked about it), but deep down, the culture absolutely exists. While some of the involuntary terminations are fair and deserved, others can be for entirely political reasons - or it can literally just be because your manager stopped liking you, for reasons that may not be related to job performance.

    Like just about every other company in silicon valley, there's a big push for diversity and inclusion. There's talks and usage of terms like "micro-aggressions," "safe spaces," and other BS made-up terms that needs to be distributed company-wide or department-wide. There are literally company meetings dedicated to talking about your feelings on some issue like this. Then entire departments will discuss it, and individual team managers will hold meetings with their teams to discuss it even more. It's so nauseating. If you even hint that you might be conservative, moderate, or hold any views other than the ultra-liberal, silicon valley social-justice-warrior mold, you will be discriminated against on the basis of your viewpoint, rather than trying to entertain a wide variety of thoughts and voices. Netflix ignores the fact that even in ultra liberal silicon valley, roughly 20-30% of their entire workforce voted for our current POTUS, circa 2016.

    Advice to Management

    "Diversity and inclusion" should really mean diversity of thought. Right now, what you have is people who look different, but think the exact same.

  8. "Very friendly"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - N/A in London, CA
    Former Employee - N/A in London, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Netflix part-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Lovely staff very great career opportunities loved working here

    Cons

    Poor career development opportunity yes

    Advice to Management

    idk just writing this review so i can get access to ur staff reviews for my report cheers


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Tier 3 / TRA"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Tier III/Technical Research Analyst in Salt Lake City, UT
    Former Employee - Tier III/Technical Research Analyst in Salt Lake City, UT
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Netflix full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    They pay above market averages and, provide great benefits.

    Cons

    While they really sell their company culture, and constantly discuss using good judgement, they really want you to do things the way they think it should be done. Your good judgement is only good if you follow their opinion of good judgement. Even if you have a good reason to do something differently, its not okay.

    Their policy of fail well means you can make a mistake once. not twice. Terminations are frequent, and abrupt. In the last 6-8 months they have termed 3 supervisors, and about 15-18 people. There is a higher than average rate of churn here.

    While they pay high wages, and provide low cost benefits this is done as a way to make everyone replaceable. It makes it easy to attract new employees.

    Earlier this year they also announced plans to change tier 1/2 support from internal netflix employees to contracted employees with a call center provider.

    Advice to Management

    Work to reduce churn rate to keep quality employees.


  10. Helpful (4)

    "Customer Service Agent"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Salt Lake City, UT
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Salt Lake City, UT
    Recommends

    I worked at Netflix full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great benefits and pay. Wonderful people to work with. Onsite cafe. Flexible scheduling.

    Cons

    No formalized QA process. What one supervisor loves and recommends you do will get you fired with the next supervisor. It's totally subjective and you never see any documentation of how you are being graded. Currently the only 2 stats are average handle time and return contact rate. You can be exceeding expectations on both and still be fired for "not providing an amazing customer experience" which could be as simple as your supervisor doesn't think your tone of voice is positive enough. Your supervisor can and will sometimes listen to every call you took in a day to find something you did wrong to fire you over. You will never see anything in writing on any monitor including the one that gets you fired.

    Advice to Management

    You pride yourself as a company on clarity. Set clear QA standards in writing that are consistent from one sup to the next and have open documentation of more than just what the sup wants you to work on for that week