Google Software Development Manager Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Google Software Development Manager Interview Questions

2 Interview Reviews

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Helpful (6)  

Software Development Manager Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate in Irvine, CA
No Offer
Positive Experience
Average Interview

Application

The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Google (Irvine, CA) in January 2011.

Interview

Applied through an internal referral for software development manager position in Irvine. Won't go into details about the position but it was mainly for managing a team that supports internal operations of Google.
Recruiter arranged a phone interview which lasted an hour. The hiring manager asked some straightforward technical questions and then asked some general questions about team leadership. The hiring manager was obviously very smart, but seemed to be under a lot of pressure.
Recruiter contacted me later and said they were "not moving forward with the position".

Interview Questions

  • Given a large unsorted text file containing thousands of words count the number of times each word appears.   2 Answers
  • Can you identify a project where you had to overcome a technical challenge?   Answer Question
  • What would you say are the minimal requirements needed to successfully manage a software development project?   3 Answers
  • How would you communicate to the team when a major change was required of a project that was already underway.   1 Answer

Other Interview Reviews for Google

  1. Helpful (9)  

    Software Development Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Google.

    Interview

    Google flew me out to California after a single phone screen. I and my phone interviewer had gotten along very well; we covered tech, management, and process in about 45 minutes.

    The recruiters were nice, although "nice" in a generic sense - you got the idea that they saw thousands of candidates each week and you were not even a name to them (for example, my recruiter had not remembered that I was unwilling to relocate, and was applying for Google in my city). The recruiting coordinators, though, were absolutely top-notch. I had a minor emergency that required a last minute reschedule, and they pulled heroics to get me there on time. Kudos to you RCs.

    The interviews themselves were a mixed bag. Google was using the Microsoft-style interview process (and, oh, how they would hate to see themselves compared to the hated MS!) where you get an as-appropriate "as-app" interview at the end. So you don't know exactly how many interviews you'll get. If you get walked out in the middle of the day because your later interviewers "went home" or were "suddenly pulled away on an emergency" then it's already gg.

    My first interviewer was amazing - the caliber of Smart Person we all like to work with. We had a great conversation that precisely split between business and tech. Incredibly good to talk with, although I didn't do well (this was apparently the mobile group, and I cannot possibly express how little I care about mobile - I don't even use apps).

    The second interviewer, by contrast, was someone I would have fired from my org. He wasted his time and mine by asking me a stupid puzzle question - something about weighing gold coins - which I figured out quickly. Puzzle questions like this are stupid. They teach the interviewer nothing about how the candidate will function in their job; if they know the *trick*, they'll pass. Sure, I figured it out, but it was a complete waste of time. I've done well over a thousand technical interviews in my time, and I would have disallowed this.

    Most of the rest of the interviews - basic service design, lunch-and-culture-fit, scenario-based problem solving, and technical conversations were all reasonable and fine. My final interviewer (the "as-app") did not want to hire me from the word go, however. He started late, cut early, and spent the intervening time checking his watch. I've had bad interviews before - as I said earlier, my first interview here didn't go well and it was entirely my fault - but this guy had ZERO interest in interviewing me. I would have been happier if they'd just cut me early.

    Interview Questions


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