State Farm Reviews | Glassdoor

State Farm Reviews

Updated August 24, 2017
5,440 reviews

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3.3
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State Farm President and CEO Michael L. Tipsord
Michael L. Tipsord
962 Ratings

5,440 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (154)

    "Too much micromanagement"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Claims Associate -ILR in Phoenix, AZ
    Current Employee - Claims Associate -ILR in Phoenix, AZ
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    State Farm has good benefits and good people. There is an extensive training program.

    Cons

    The metrics are unbearable. State Farm is losing customers and great employees because of the micromanagement of each call. Average handle time is recorded daily and "coached" in front of the team on a daily basis if not met. It's nearly impossible to give the quality of customer service that State Farm customers need and deserve during a claim call during the time allotted to do so. The stress and the constant "coaching" is driving good employees away.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to your front line employees-- the people actually doing the job. We are smart people and know what we are doing. We understand it costs the company money when our call times are 30 seconds longer than average. We understand that it means more people need to be on the phone. However, what management doesn't seem to understand is how frustrated the employees AND customers are with being rushed through the claim process. State Farm will more than make up for the handful of extra employees required to be on the phones by retaining more State Farm customers, making new customers with excellent customer service to claimants, and not having to retrain new associates when frustrated associates leave.


  2. Helpful (35)

    "Prior to our reorganization we were concerned ourselves both with satisfying customers and developing our people."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Claims Team Manager in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Claims Team Manager in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    An attractive major medical healthcare package.
    Tuition reimbursement after one year of employment, with qualifying grades.
    Employee discount program, local and US.

    Cons

    Salary is no longer competitive.
    PTO / sick time is no longer advantageous, especially for new employees.
    Inability to keep up with technology trends and customer demand will surely cause the company to lose market share.
    Demands places on management are unreasonable, met with unreasonable expectations to subordinates.
    Policies are conflicting and accountability is inconsistent.

    Advice to Management

    Reorganization and reduction of has occurred at the incorrect level across multiple departments. We've paid multiple third party vendors millions of policyholder dollars to tell us what we already knew about OUR business, implement changes that were not to the benefit of OUR customers (remember those MUTUAL policyholders - the ones, who in theory, own our business??)

    Training is poor, skill sets have been reduced to glorified phone operators, management oversees metrics - not quality driven, customer centric service and deliverables. New departments exist purely to be proud of the paper they produce. Yet, VPOs and OVPs are amazed we continue to lose market share.... that JD Power scores are failing.... customer complaints are soaring.... attrition and termination rates are at an all time high. Morale is plummeting daily, alongside Agent and customer confidence.

  3. Helpful (27)

    "Conservative Fortune 50 company, Slower pace than most, decent pay, and they have a pension+401k"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Bloomington, IL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Bloomington, IL
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Name recognition of State Farm is massive, and it's a trusted brand. It's a large and very stable company that is very conservative financially. I have no doubt that they really know how to manage investments and their money (they've done just that for 95+years now).

    If you're in Bloomington, IL (the HQ) your pay will be good given the cost of living there. It *will* be less than any place on the coasts, but again COL is so much less. If you're in other locations pay is only somewhat competitive.

    Of course the pension + 401k is a big hook for many, and it vests after 5 years, but to get any real value from the pension you need to work here 15+ years.... and that's exactly what most people here do.

    The other benefits here are good at least competitive with most companies. except we don't do the kinds of perks that most tech companies provide in terms of free food. The health insurance is Blue Cross Blue Shield and what we pay isn't massive. Rx co-pays are ok. If you choose a high deductible plan they'll throw $2k into a medical savings account that's use-it-or-lose-it each year but it covers a nice chunk of any medical care you may have during the first part of the year.

    The pace is is slower than most. Not that your workload won't be fairly high, but things are slow moving. People don't work long hours (unless they really like that kind of thing). It's a ghost town past 4:30 here (we work 8-4:15), and working the weekend is unheard of unless you're an part of the crew doing a release.

    The fringe benefits of working at SF and living in Bloomington, IL are pretty good if you have kids. They have SF Park that has a pool and mini-golf and sports courts galore as well as discount programs with local and national retailers.

    Work related stress is only as high as you let it be 95% of the time. There's very little environmental stress with the exception of the frustration and lack of hope in people's eyes you see when things fail to release or release quickly.

    Once you get in here, you'll never have to leave. Getting fired is next to impossible unless you break the law. If you're looking for someplace to land and then stay until retirement this is your place. I've had a few colleagues who've retired here who came for the last 10-15 years of their career and it worked out for them rather well. That's a pro for the person, but not for the company :).

    Cons

    State Farm is slowly but surely running itself into the ground, though I do not believe they'll ever go out of business they'll become much less relevant in the market over the next 5-10 years. Here are the reasons I see for that:

    1) Technically we use outdated systems (well most insurance companies do) and it's been super hard for this organization to overcome them and try to come into the 20th century (yes I said 20th, because 21st century is a long way off here in most ways).
    2) Culturally this place is holding on so hard to "State Farm Nice" and keeping their #1 status and fading glory (they don't know it's fading!) that they'll run a huge multi-year program throwing huge amounts of money at it and then when it produces next to nothing, they'll close it on schedule, call it a success and then move on to the next thing a bunch of consultants told them would help modernize the company.

    3) In the desperation to get things done faster, SF is willing to push anything out into production no matter what the customer experience is. There's lately been a lot of pressure to simply show something happening so we strongly suffer from a focus on activity over results that have impact and/or high quality.

    4) Their IT department is massive and moribund, with thousands of people who've been there for 20-30 years and have very few modern IT skills and a CTO who either cannot (because of company culture or inability... I really have no idea which) or will not push the company to move to become a technology powerhouse that it *could* be. Similarly he's not being truthful about what he can or cannot get the IT organization to do or not do... or he simply doesn't know.

    5) Their approach to people/talent is relentlessly focused on the idea that people are interchangeable resources and you can take someone from Claims and have them do IT-related work and they'll be successful, or you can take an exec from the agency force and put them into marketing, or you can take a mainframe guy and put him into java or database management or IT security. Of course a few outstanding people CAN do this well, but most can't. They just don't understand people with specialized skill sets and hiring top talent.

    6) Decision makers are so far removed from what's actually happening in the company and people are so unwilling to confront difficult topics (State Farm Nice) that they don't make good choices. I've heard some of the most ridiculous decisions and reasoning for those decisions that make me believe that the decision makers were fed misinformation or it was so badly mangled in the game of telephone (because individual producers simply don't get any significant amount of time with higher level people without close supervision and message control from their managers.)

    7) Management, which is called "Leadership" internally, is usually anything but leading us. There are a few good ones, but more often they are managing their departments in a way to preserve the status quo and/or their influence/career. Top execs leadership style/philosophy is old-school and not very progressive. 1st line managers, like most companies, are a mixed bag. I've had some great ones and decent ones, and I have a few friends who have really terrible ones.

    8) They're almost all old, white men who hold the actual reigns of the company, and the very top people have always been lawyers for the past few decades. (As a counterpoint, I do have to say that women are in many, many senior positions at the VP level and in the middle management layers around director level. Minorities of most types aren't terribly visible in management/executives, but the LGBTQ support form the company is high and highly rated).

    Advice to Management

    Here's something simple: remove the need for employees to log in to their web browsers. That's just a ridiculous waste of time multiple times day. 1-5 seconds wasted hundreds of thousands/day by employees adds up fast. Same thing with the extra checkbox to get into a Skype meeting as well as the extra click to get onto the VPN. It's all a needless waste of time that virtually no other company does.

    Another quick fix: get a real social platform for internal collaboration (not the current SharePoint-based ridiculousness.. isn't Yammer still free for companies?).

    If they were to go radical change, I'd say hire more, a lot more, outside people for VP and higher positions as well as for other key technical and digital/UX positions to replace the people we have there now. Give many/most of the those people the typical golden parachute and/or offer early retirement benefits (i.e. they can start drawing on the pension at an earlier age and bump their years of service).

    A more moderate (though still major) change would be create a new technical system that could handle most/all our policy/payment/claims/internal systems and then find a cut-over date where all new transactions/policies are on the new system along with a ton of training for people to just continually apologize if there's any kind of delay or problem when a rep goes to help them because they have to search/use or use two different systems. Within 1 year of pain all policies with just a few exceptions (very small %, though large in terms of absolute numbers) will be onto the new system. Band-aids can only be added on band-aids for so many layers before it's all just one big band-aid that will eventually crap out.

    Legal clearly plays a major role in an insurance company, I'm not saying it shouldn't. Policies are contracts and litigation is simply a part of doing business in this industry. That said, legal carries way too much organizational power here. Legal and executives should clearly communicate openly that legal advice is ADVICE, a recommendation that quite often doesn't have to be followed exactly. Legal needs to get better at being clear when what advice they give is them trying their very best to protect the company by being conservative, and what would automatically land us in trouble with a lawsuit or the government. They need to communicate openly on every level that when they render advice the department asking the question or making the request ultimately has decision power on the action. They also need to make it clearer and easier for their decisions/actions/recommendations to be viewed inside the company so that we don't end up with people spreading rumors about what is/is not allowed or recommended because we end up with people saying things with the voice of legal who really are just spreading their own misinterpretation of the situation.


  4. Helpful (2)

    "It's a New State Farm"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Atlanta, GA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good benefits, good pay ranges, if start at entry level can move around if supported by leadership, company has good tenure and financial strength.

    Cons

    Not the old SF. A lot of changes. not as much growth after you reach a few level. Not focused on employees just surviving in market. The Call Centers are strict and they don't pay for adjusters but adjusting claims.

    Advice to Management

    Be leaders not managers. revamp attendance policy.


  5. "Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at State Farm full-time

    Pros

    Great place and environment to work at

    Cons

    None. I had to move to different state

    Advice to Management

    Great people


  6. "State Farm"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time

    Pros

    Benefits, Company's Financial Status

    Cons

    Advancement opportunities are limited. Job opportunities are moving to other states .


  7. "CCC Sales Rep"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dunwoody, GA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dunwoody, GA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great flexibility. Company pays for license exams. Very relaxed company culture. Base plus commission. Internal promotion at multiple locations. Management is is easy to get along with

    Cons

    Being on the phones can get very old and repetitive really quick. If you're a night shift worker, it can be hard to get morning hours. You HAVE to work one day on the weekend.

    Advice to Management

    N/A

  8. "Customer Service Representative"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative in Sioux City, IA
    Current Employee - Customer Service Representative in Sioux City, IA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Just starting off so everything seems to be good. Looking forward to helping people out.

    Cons

    I am aware at this time. Ask me in year or so.


  9. "Great place to work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at State Farm full-time

    Pros

    Flexible schedule - willing to work with you
    Great Training Courses

    Cons

    Wish there was more vacation in your first year working


  10. "Good Neighbor"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Good culture, good people, collaborative

    Cons

    not a bad place to work


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