State Farm Reviews | Glassdoor

State Farm Reviews

Updated April 21, 2018
6,544 reviews

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3.1
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State Farm President and CEO Michael L. Tipsord
Michael L. Tipsord
1,514 Ratings

6,544 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Work life balance is hard to meet (in 295 reviews)

  • There is absolutely no work/life balance (in 124 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. "Excellent Company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time

    Pros

    Great company to work for and be a part of. Lots of potential for growth and great compensation.

    Cons

    Only issue is that your experience with the company will be vastly dependent on the agent that you work for. This can make it difficult to find consistently applied principles as related to the job.


  2. Helpful (248)

    "Too much micromanagement"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Claims Associate -ILR in Phoenix, AZ
    Current Employee - Claims Associate -ILR in Phoenix, AZ
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    State Farm has good benefits and good people. There is an extensive training program.

    Cons

    The metrics are unbearable. State Farm is losing customers and great employees because of the micromanagement of each call. Average handle time is recorded daily and "coached" in front of the team on a daily basis if not met. It's nearly impossible to give the quality of customer service that State Farm customers need and deserve during a claim call during the time allotted to do so. The stress and the constant "coaching" is driving good employees away.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to your front line employees-- the people actually doing the job. We are smart people and know what we are doing. We understand it costs the company money when our call times are 30 seconds longer than average. We understand that it means more people need to be on the phone. However, what management doesn't seem to understand is how frustrated the employees AND customers are with being rushed through the claim process. State Farm will more than make up for the handful of extra employees required to be on the phones by retaining more State Farm customers, making new customers with excellent customer service to claimants, and not having to retrain new associates when frustrated associates leave.

  3. Helpful (89)

    "State Farm's new direction is uncertain -- perhaps not a good company anymore"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Quantitative Analyst in Bloomington, IL
    Former Employee - Quantitative Analyst in Bloomington, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at State Farm full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I've worked at State Farm for 3+ years.

    1. Pay is OK for this area, especially if you factor in the Pension. Note that pension is NOT the same as a 401K as the investment risk falls on the Employer and it's fully insured by PBGC so your retirement is pretty much "guaranteed".

    2. I'm an exempt employee so I don't feel all that micromanaging that people are talking about here. Yes, there is 1-1 with manager each week, or every 2 weeks, but that depends on whether you like to have them and you are not required to have them. I don't see that as micromanaging, but an opportunity to communicate my progress and my concerns with management and they can communicate their expectation to me. It creates a more productive environment.

    3. The time off system has been changed -- it wasn't as good as before, but still great compared to other companies I've worked for. Some complains about limited sick days versus unlimited sick days before. I can't see how this is a valid complain -- I don't know any company that gives unlimited sick days so this is rather just eliminating abuse.

    4. Some perks are nice -- SF park activities, discount programs such as Hertz rental car, local services, restaurants....etc. They also give you three fully paid trips to places like Hawaii, Bahamas, or Canada if you study and obtain the corresponding insurance designation. Also they pay for your masters once you complete a designation but degree must be relavant to your current role.

    5. Depending on the department, work life balance can be good, but given recent company underperformance, that'll likely change (if it hasn't already).

    6. Lets you move to different positions, but this will like be more restrictive going forward.

    Cons

    1. Annual raises are controlled by the enterprise and NO department can go over the cap of 2.5% on average -- seriously? 2.5%? Taking into account current inflation, you are giving your employee a 0.3% raise for good performance.

    2. Way too difficult to change anything around here. All this preaching about "Change" from senior leadership but the fact is you can't change anything. Senior leadership perhaps already has a vision for the company or its subsidiaries and they aren't going to take "no" for an answer. I feel they care about their bonus and "making things look good" more than actual, organic growth.

    3. SF puts in layers of "validation" functions but in reality they are just multiple people playing "devil's advocate". I get the "Three lines of defense", but at SF, it's more like 5+ lines. I would recognize their value if they actually add any. However, the reality is most of those people are completely unqualified to give any opinion. They hire students straight from college with zero industry experience to "audit" a process that they probably have no clue whatsoever. As a result, most of those "oversight" functions come up with "findings" that makes absolutely no sense. Yet, we must deal with it because it's a "finding". Instead of giving some real and useful advice, these multiple layers of "defense" functions have this "got you" kind of mentality. They are really a backward and impeding force. We can build a better forecasting model in 3 weeks, but to get it validated, we must push it through those "defense" functions which may take a year or more. Most of us who have 10+ years of industry experience and a Master's or PhD just don't want to deal with this kind of absurdity and hence we'd rather keep our mouth shut when people asks us if there's a better model. The end result? Departments end up using outdated models that are producing huge errors.

    4. Retaliation -- many people come in with new and legitamate ideas, but director-level managers are often unwilling to listen -- they encourage constructive feedback, but as soon as they remotely sense you want to challenge them, you'll face strong passive agressiveness.

    5. I have not directly dealt with the Enterprise Claims department. However, I heard from people who works there that they are completely burned out and they are not treated as human beings. Senior Management doesn't seem to understand that failure to treat your client facing employees with dignity is what's driving the current losses.

    6. Location -- It's the middle of nowhere here. It used to be okay because SF once promised that they'll never have layoffs and will place people elsewhere in the organization to the best extent they can. NOT the case anymore. Laid off workers will likely have to sell their homes at a loss and move elsewhere.

    7. A lack of transparency -- with the recent tumoil in the company, little was communicated to us as to why is this happening and what is being done to improve customer service ratings and stop losing policies.

    8. Division of labor -- they want to hire the most talented people, but fails to give them suitable tasks. As a result, talented people are not using their skills and their growth prospects are dim -- they soon leave the company.

    9. You can help yourself with a free glass of tap water. Soda is $2 in the cafeteria, double what I pay at McDonald's. Starbucks machine on 2nd floor, but pricier than the actual Starbucks store.

    10. Medical benefits are not good -- 5000 deductible HSA being the ONLY option. Yet cost goes up each year by at least 5% whereas your salary goes up by only 2.5% or less.

    Advice to Management

    1. Seriously, lose the 2.5% salary increase cap. This is the most absurd rule I've ever heard. If your employee worked 100 hours on a noteworthy project for you, he/she deserves to be recognized and compesated properly. I'm not saying to give everyone 30% each year, but exceptions should be made for exceptional employees. My manager said someone can get 5% and some can get 0% so good performers are rewarded. That doesn't make sense at all. So what if your team all worked hard on a project and everyone deserves to be rewarded? Someone will have to be thrown under the bus to meet this 2.5% cap. In addition, the annual increase should cover at least the increases in local property tax and medical insurance premiums -- otherwise, you are actually cutting your employee's real wage.

    2. Why would you ask your most highly paid and highly educated employees to spend most of their time dealing with tasks that can be completed by anyone with a college degree? Instead of paying those insane salaries to those "validation" teams, you'd rather hire some assistants for your most valuable statisticians and have the assistants complete the procedural documents -- that's money well spent! I interned at an equity research firm and almost every quant have at least 1-2 assistant helping them dealing with model documentations.

    3. Senior leadership needs to communicate the reason behind the current loss of policy and and plummeting customer satisfaction ratings. What's being done to stop the losses?

    4. Treat your customer-facing employees with respect and don't be scrooge with them. If they are angry, so will your clients.

    5. Cost reduction is important, but overdoing it will lower employee morale. Cost cutting will NOT miraculously increase sales, or retain customers. I can name three major companies that went under in the past decade which would probably have survived if they chose innovation rather than meaningless cost cutting. Instead of taking away benefits or perks from your people, who are directly dealing with your clients, a bigger focus should be on what's driving the lowered sales and higher cancellations.

    Bottom line, I am not going to claim I know how to run a Fortune 100 company, but looking at the recent trends, it is obvious that your current strategy is not working. So perhaps it's time to really drop your ego and really discover what's driving the decline, before it's too late!


  4. Helpful (38)

    "An Amazing Decline/Trust Your Gut"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at State Farm full-time

    Pros

    (At the time)

    Fair pay and predictable bonus structure
    They were pretty good at covering travel expenses and paying them back quickly
    Diverse workforce & diversity initiatives
    Fun and funny coworkers
    Opportunities for growth
    Again, this was all four years ago and has likely changed

    Cons

    (At the time and now, according to other comments)

    Arrogant to a fault
    Total lack of innovation & willingness to innovate
    Odd attachment to the company's past (which prevents progress)
    High number of veterans (20+ years) who are determined to get that retirement money, and therefore, are resistant to change and technology
    Heavy reliance on command and control management style
    Poor decision-making that leads to losses of all kinds

    Advice to Management

    When I was first hired to State Farm back in 2010, I felt truly blessed and fortunate. I felt I had found my work "home," and that I would be able to learn and grow over time, and watch my career develop. And guess what? It did. I held three different positions at State Farm, each "better" than the last in terms of challenge, growth, and pay. I used to brag to others about State Farm and actively try to recruit them. I was a true believer and evangelist.

    State Farm was like an abusive relationship in that, there were times when things were good! Really good! And then, there were those bad times...

    Even though my career was progressing, I was met at every level with some of the most hateful, spiteful, narcissistic leadership you could ever imagine. Egomaniacs and control freaks of the highest order. It was almost like they didn't want us to succeed, for fear that we may take their jobs someday. The behaviors got so bad that I even told one of my managers, "There's no amount of money in this world that could get me to do your job. You all seem miserable." This was toward the end of our relationship, of course. In each role, my managers found something, anything they could to harp on, and once I fixed that, something new would pop up to "fix." It was a moving target. They never taught, they only scolded. They treated employees of every age like children, from age 21 to age 61. It was disgraceful.

    Others took the time to focus on my personality. My work product was excellent and above standard according to one, but they always shifted the focus to my "happiness." "Are you happy? You don't seem happy. Others are worried that you're not happy. Are you happy? Your happiness, or lack thereof, is affecting the team." When I'd ask clarifying questions like, "What makes you think I'm not happy?" "How is it affecting the team?" "Describe a time when you distinctly thought I wasn't happy..." they couldn't do it. Never could. It morphed into vague generalizations and hearsay (made up stuff). They could never give me actionable specifics, and therefore, I could never correct the "problems."

    At the time, I did not realize that I was witnessing the beginning of the end. Everything that happened to me was symptomatic of a company preparing to enter into decline. Instead of leadership banding together and figuring out how to fix it, they chose to eat their babies. And they're paying for it dearly now.

    The second part of this title is to trust your gut, and this is where I'll speak to current employees: When I quit State Farm, people thought I was crazy. I had a great title and pay. I had climbed through the ranks relatively quickly. The path was clear, but I wasn't willing to fight off psychopaths along the way. So I trusted my belief that I could do better for myself, and I did. You don't deserve poor treatment from anyone, and especially not your employer. Sometimes you have to vote with your feet. Although you will be brainwashed, threatened, and intimidated, State Farm is not the end all be all. There is life outside of SF. There are other industries. Regardless of what you do, you have picked up some valuable skills that are highly transferable in the marketplace. Don't give up on yourself. Start saving money and get out of there. You will survive and you will be better for it.


  5. Helpful (143)

    "Prior to our reorganization we were concerned ourselves both with satisfying customers and developing our people."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Claims Team Manager in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Claims Team Manager in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    An attractive major medical healthcare package.
    Tuition reimbursement after one year of employment, with qualifying grades.
    Employee discount program, local and US.

    Cons

    Salary is no longer competitive.
    PTO / sick time is no longer advantageous, especially for new employees.
    Inability to keep up with technology trends and customer demand will surely cause the company to lose market share.
    Demands places on management are unreasonable, met with unreasonable expectations to subordinates.
    Policies are conflicting and accountability is inconsistent.

    Advice to Management

    Reorganization and reduction of has occurred at the incorrect level across multiple departments. We've paid multiple third party vendors millions of policyholder dollars to tell us what we already knew about OUR business, implement changes that were not to the benefit of OUR customers (remember those MUTUAL policyholders - the ones, who in theory, own our business??)

    Training is poor, skill sets have been reduced to glorified phone operators, management oversees metrics - not quality driven, customer centric service and deliverables. New departments exist purely to be proud of the paper they produce. Yet, VPOs and OVPs are amazed we continue to lose market share.... that JD Power scores are failing.... customer complaints are soaring.... attrition and termination rates are at an all time high. Morale is plummeting daily, alongside Agent and customer confidence.


  6. Helpful (5)

    "Established Company making lots of changes"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 8 years)

    Pros

    Great Benefits, the people are great, good work/life balance, established company

    Cons

    Growing in Atlanta, Dallas, Phoenix and Bloomington only

    Advice to Management

    It is unfortunate that after so many years with the company employees are being forced to find new jobs because the company is choosing to consolidate into oversaturated markets. There doesn't seem to be much diversity at the highest levels of senior leadership. You have a great chance to grow with the company if you are willing to live in one of those 4 cities.


  7. Helpful (20)

    "Factory"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Solid benefits package. Clean, well-maintained facilities that are reasonably secure. Very accommodating of special needs.

    Cons

    If I wanted to work in a factory, I would find a job in a factory. I am an educated and experienced claims professional, and that used to be my job here. Now we crank out tasks for the sake of efficiency, at the expense of delivering the caring and personal local service our customers used to receive.

    Advice to Management

    You will lose policyholders in unprecedented numbers if the claims enterprise continues in the direction it’s headed.
    Go back to treating your people like people.

  8. "Good"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Chicken Enthusiast
    Current Employee - Chicken Enthusiast
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    It was pretty good I enjoyed the food

    Cons

    The work environment didn't provide enough chicken

    Advice to Management

    More chicken


  9. "Office Representative- Agent Staff"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Office Representative in Garden Grove, CA
    Current Employee - Office Representative in Garden Grove, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at State Farm full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    It really makes a world of difference what agent you work under. My agent is awesome. He is very flexible as long as we are making our goals. It is typically fun to go out to local businesses and meet new people and help enforce the brand. I had state farm insurance before I ever worked here.

    Cons

    No benefits, minimal pay, sales goals, lots cold calling

    State Farm is sort of franchised to agents- so there isn't benefits like what you would have at a huge company.


  10. "Auto Claims"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Auto Claim Representative in Tempe, AZ
    Former Employee - Auto Claim Representative in Tempe, AZ
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at State Farm full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great pay. Great teams. Reasonable benefits options. And excellent respect for individuality! You can tattoo your body and color your hair any way you want, and they respect you. You are not forced to dress-up every day, but it is encouraged. Most people are able to wear casual clothes every day (jeans, acceptable t-shirts or button-ups, etc.). In addition you get to talk to some pretty pleasant people, who are just seeking your help and expertise. It is a good feeling to help someone and know they appreciate your assistance.

    Cons

    Having to deal with some of the rudest people on the planet...and I mean RUDE. There are people that want it their way and no legal procedure can be explained to them otherwise. Performance standards are realistic, but are also often hard to attain (due to long call times or inability to follow schedule to a “T”). It’s an often positive environment, but when you get called out for your lack of performance to numbers you had no control over, it sucks. But, it happens and you move on.

    Advice to Management

    Treat your employees like a team, but be a team with them. Each person deserves your attention.


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