Program Coordinator Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Program Coordinator Interview Questions

"Employers looking for program coordinators want applicants with the organizational skills to coordinate multiple projects that make up a company program. As a program coordinator you will be responsible for organizing meetings among members of multiple projects, updating program goals, and ensuring that all participating projects are communicating with one another. Expect interviewers to ask about your experience with coordinating tasks for multiple group projects as well your critical thinking, problem solving, and leadership skills."

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How would you handle multiple projects at once?

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Through organizational methods that I use personally (i.e. making lists) and also using company resources that are created to help with office efficiency and planning.

How would you handle the many competing events and production deadlines of the program's initiatives, and how do you handle adversity and emergency.

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Q. How would you handle a faculty member that might be a little bit difficult?

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What can you bring to the program?

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Talk about every single job you've ever had

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which is your favorite subject? and questions regarding that subject

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what is your strength and weakness?

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What kind of professional experience do you have working as a program coordinator?

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Please explain a time when you took initiative.

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During the interview, I had to put together 2 instructor pay amounts based on their laborious system. They make you sit down and open up several Excel files, Word Files, Google and then put together the individual instructor pay for a month., looking at individual contracts, calculate mileage, pay is based on several different parameters, hourly pay amounts change per each school, per instructor, per amount of students, etc etc. I believe they are using a very inefficient way of paying instructors that can leave lots of room for making errors. After trying to figure all that out, then they come back and show you on paper what you got wrong. They also pay mileage to contracted employees, which instructors should be doing this themselves, and could lead to problems with the IRS with Employee vs. Contractors pay issues. I have worked as contractor with several companies, mileage is my own responsibility that I write off as a contractor.

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